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Wedding & Event Venue Near York, SC.

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Your Magic Moment Awaits

Your wedding day. Without a doubt, it's one of the most significant events you will ever experience - when you and the love of your life officially seal the deal and get married. On this day, your friends and family will gather to celebrate the next step in your life. Photographers will be running around snapping photos, catering plates delicious food for guests to enjoy, and the DJ sets the mood for a night of fun and libation. You've worked extra hard to make everything look perfect and run smoothly. You have examined every moving part down to the tiniest detail. At the center of all your effort is your wedding venue in York, SC.

Your event space can mean the difference between an unforgettable event and an average occasion. Capturing your uniqueness as a couple is paramount to a memorable wedding. But, without the right venue location and staff, your unforgettable event can turn into a painfully average occasion. Fortunately, at Abney Hall, you won't ever have to worry about dingy reception spaces and crummy chow halls.

Constructed in York, SC, in 1962, Abney Hall is 15,000 square feet and sits on 500 acres of land, making it a large wedding venue unlike any other. Abney Hall was originally the home of Mrs. Josephine Abney, a York native who was a lifelong philanthropist. Mrs. Abney devoted much of her time and effort towards supporting charities, educational institutions, hospitals, and other noble efforts. Today, Abney Hall stands tall as a symbol of love, both in our community and for the couples who choose to get married here.

Abney Hall is an exclusive event experience unlike any other, surrounded by verdant forests and sparkling ponds. Our venue is a natural fit for several occasions, including:

Special Event Space York, SC

Weddings

 Event Venue York, SC

Bridal Showers

 Event Space York, SC

Bridal Portraits

 Rehearsal Dinner Venue York, SC

Rehearsal Dinners

 Bridal Shower Venue York, SC

Corporate Events

 Business Event Space York, SC

Much More!

 Wedding Space York, SC

The Top Wedding Venue in York, SC

The beginning of your life starts at Abney Hall. With our team by your side, we can create the fairy tale wedding you have dreamed about since childhood. Whether you have 100 guests or 1,000, our waterfront ceremony locations and French-inspired courtyard are perfect for your big day. Celebrate in luxurious style surrounded by shady magnolia trees, a private forest, large ponds, and the beauty of Mother Nature. While our venue location and aesthetic have been praised far and wide, so too have the practical aspects of Abney Hall. Looking for a relaxing, comfortable spot for your bridal party to get ready in? We offer an entire floor in the Abney Hall residence to get the bridal party ready. Want to make your groomsman feel extra-special too? We've got a private, plush house just feet from a sparkling pond that is a proper hangout spot for the guys in your group.

To make life easier on you, we also offer Abney Hall as your go-to spot for rehearsal dinners. Why book an expensive restaurant or travel to another location when unmatched beauty and convenience are right at your fingertips? Abney Hall is just the place for that very important dinner the night before your big day. We are also happy to host your bridal shower at Abney Hall. Our venue makes for one of York's most unique bridal shower settings, where your family and friends can gather to give gifts and be merry before you walk down the aisle.

With such a large, magnificent house and a vast property, Abney Hall also makes for an unforgettable location for your bridal portraits and other wedding-related photography needs. Don't take our word for it - book a tour and see for yourself why so many new brides and grooms choose Abney Hall as their wedding venue in York.

 Wedding Venue York, SC

What Sets Abney Hall Apart from Other Wedding Venues in York?

You've already found the person you want to spend the rest of your life beside. The next step? Finding the perfect wedding venue for your ceremony, reception, and celebration of your lifelong commitment to one another. Remember, the backdrop for photos, dancing, eating, and all other activities will be at your wedding venue. That's why we work so hard to set Abney Hall apart from our competitors - so you and your guests can focus on love and living your new life while we work with your vendors and photographers to make your magic night a reality.

Here are just a few reasons why guests choose Abney Hall as their wedding venue in York, SC, along with some helpful tips from our experienced wedding venue staff:

Venue Size

Choosing the appropriate-sied venue for your desired guest count is a critical decision. A venue's capacity affects the number of people you need to consider having at your ceremony and reception. As you're first starting out, we recommend having a guest count in mind as you're searching for the right venue. Try to stick with that number. You may fall in love with a particular venue, but if its max capacity can't accommodate your guest count, it may be time to cross them off your list.

 Corporate Conference Hall York, SC
Abney Hall Pro Tip

Abney Hall Pro Tip:

Keep in mind that this is your big day. You shouldn't feel obligated to invite the college roommate you shared a dorm with for one semester. At the end of the day, your wedding venue should be one that can accommodate those closest to you. Abney Hall is equipped for both small and large weddings, consisting of 500 acres of forest, ponds, and lush natural beauty. Whether you want an intimate wedding with only your best friends or a grand ceremony with hundreds of people, we have the right amount of room to make you comfortable.

Location and Nearby Lodging

On your big day, you're likely to have friends and family traveling in from other parts of the state or country. These folks will need a place to stay during and even after your wedding. Accessibility and ease are important factors when it comes to choosing your wedding venue for both you and your guests.

Located in York, SC, Abney Hall is situated in a memorable, natural setting, giving your wedding a private vibe in the midst of Mother Nature. While we pride ourselves on having a secluded wedding event space, our venue is within an easy driving distance of hotels and vacation rentals.

Abney Hall Pro Tip

Abney Hall Pro Tip:

When you contact us for a tour, make sure to speak with our experienced venue manager about nearby hotels and shuttle service options. We understand that your guest's comfort and convenience are important, and we're happy to work with you to figure out the best way to get your guests to Abney Hall.

Venue Staff

At Abney Hall, our staff has earned its reputation as one of the industry's most friendly, accessible teams. We will provide you with a purpose-minded point of contact that can help answer questions relating to timelines, preferred vendors, and every aspect of your wedding. When you tour our wedding venue in York, SC, for the first time, we want you to feel like you have all the information you need to make an informed purchasing decision.

We would be happy to go over:
  • Venue Pricing
  • Ceremony Specifics
  • Reception Specifics
  • Catering Possibilities
  • Decorating Possibilities
  • Entertainment Options
  • Photography and Photo Opportunities
  • Venue Amenities
  • Bridal Party Needs
  • Groomsman Needs

At Abney Hall, our goal is to be your first resource when it comes to setting up and coordinating the details of your wedding day.

Decor

When it comes to your wedding's decor, you probably already have a few ideas in mind. We love it when our brides and grooms have a vision in mind because one of our greatest joys is turning that vision into a reality. At Abney Hall, our team is available to help you and your decorator fit, accent, and accommodate your fairy-tale wedding - whatever that may be.

Are you looking to dress up your wedding with decorations galore? Just want to add a few accents that tie into your preferred color palette? Abney Hall is versatile and ready to help however we are able.

 Reception Hall York, SC
Abney-Hall-Pro-Tip

Abney Hall Pro Tip:

If you're thinking about bringing in your own greenery, lighting, floral pieces, and more, we recommend discussing your vision with us on your initial tour of our event space. That way, we can get a head start on making your big day exactly how you envision it.

Photo Opportunities

10 years from now, when you and your spouse are celebrating your anniversary, you will pull out photographs from your wedding and will reminisce about the unforgettable time you spent at Abney Hall. Your wedding photos will be with you forever, and as such, we work closely with you and your photographer to suggest extra-special photo op spots that you can only find on Abney Hall grounds.

From the grand staircase and French-inspired courtyard to our manicured gardens and lovely pond, there is no shortage of photo-op locations for your photographer to choose from. As one of the most popular wedding venues in York, SC, we have worked with dozens of photographers over the years.

Our experience has allowed us to cultivate a list of preferred photographers - all of whom have the talent to take your pictures to the next level in a setting they're familiar with. We encourage you to check out our gallery to get a sense of the scope of our wedding venue and gain inspiration from other happy couples.

Abney-Hall-Pro-Tip

Abney Hall Pro Tip

The gallery on our website is extensive but be sure to check out our Facebook and Instagram pages as well. We keep our social pages updated with recent wedding photographs, giving you an incredible resource that you can use for your own photography purposes.

Special Event Space York, SC

The Premier Corporate Event Venue in York, SC

Abney Hall is known across the United States for our stunning weddings, but we also play host to some of the largest corporate events in South Carolina. Why choose a bland, lifeless meeting space when you can enjoy the beauty of Mother Nature coupled with a professional atmosphere? If you have an important team-building event or corporate conference that you have to coordinate, look no further than Abney Hall.

The epitome of class and style, our corporate event space is large, lavish, and chock-full of onsite amenities for you and your co-workers to enjoy. If your team needs a morale boost, don't bring them to the local Olive Garden for a cheap lunch. Treat them to a refreshing experience in our main dining room, where we can work with you to incorporate your catering options with the goals of your event.

When the hard work is done, and your team needs a breather, what better way to relax than with a quick dip in our pool? To burn off a little steam, head over to our brand-new tennis court - the perfect place to get some exercise in an ultra-private setting while you enjoy the sights and sounds of nature. Don't forget to bring your fishing poles for a couple of hours of fishing. There's even an opportunity to go hunting if you wish.

 Event Venue York, SC

Elegance at Its Finest - Only
a Phone Call Away

If you're ready to learn more about Abney Hall as your wedding venue, don't hesitate to reach out. We would love to hear more about your plans, your vision, and your needs. We know that planning a wedding isn't easy. It takes time, attention to detail, and a whole lot of patience. Our goal is to help provide you with all the info you need to learn more about our venue. Once you decide on a date, we'll work closely with you and your vendors to craft a wedding experience that you will treasure for the rest of your life.

Our available dates for your big day are going quick, especially during peak seasons like spring and fall. We look forward to hearing from you soon!

Contact us today for a FREE initial consultation
 Event Space York, SC

Latest News in York, SC

Nicole Will Move Up the East Coast, Bringing Heavy Rain

Tropical Storm Nicole, which hit the east coast of Florida as a Category 1 hurricane early Thursday, was expected to bring heavy rain from the Carolinas to New England through the weekend, meteorologists said.After crossing Central Florida on Thursday, Nicole was predicted to emerge over the far northeastern Gulf of Mexico and then move across the Florida Panhandle, according to the National Hurricane Center.Nicole w...

Tropical Storm Nicole, which hit the east coast of Florida as a Category 1 hurricane early Thursday, was expected to bring heavy rain from the Carolinas to New England through the weekend, meteorologists said.

After crossing Central Florida on Thursday, Nicole was predicted to emerge over the far northeastern Gulf of Mexico and then move across the Florida Panhandle, according to the National Hurricane Center.

Nicole will move across Georgia and South Carolina on Friday and then farther north, David Roth, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service Weather Prediction Center, said on Thursday.

As Nicole moves through the Southeast, it’s likely to bring tornadoes across the region.

“A few tornadoes are expected during the day from northern Florida into eastern Georgia and South Carolina, and possibly overnight into southern North Carolina,” according to an update early Thursday from the Storm Prediction Center.

Tornadoes are common in hurricanes and are often relatively weak and short-lived, but they can still pose a significant threat if one strikes a populated area.

“By time we get to Friday night and into Saturday, the low pressure system associated with the storm is expected to be accelerating up the Appalachians,” before reaching New England by Sunday, Mr. Roth said.

5-day rainfall forecast

BAHAMAS Thu. 1 p.m.

Sources: The New York Times; rainfall forecast by NOAA as of 1:30 p.m. Eastern on Nov. 10. Estimates are for Nov. 9 through Nov. 14. Times are Eastern.

While heavy rain and strong winds from Nicole were a concern for many Floridians, other states in the storm’s path will mainly get rain.

Nicole will likely be downgraded to a tropical depression as it moves over Georgia, Mr. Roth said.

“The forecast is for two to four inches, with local amounts of six inches, as it moves through the southeast Appalachians,” he said. Parts of the Northeast and New England could see lower amounts.

Since the storm was expected to be a rain maker, there was a slight risk of excessive rainfall from the Southeast to New York, according to the Weather Prediction Center.

“The worry is that there could be some hourly rain totals of an inch, inch and a half, which over a few hours could overwhelm” urban areas or places with high elevations, Mr. Roth said.

Once the warmer, tropical-like rainy weather from Nicole pushes through the Northeast, a colder air mass will move across the East, dropping high temperatures well below average on Sunday.

State proficiency levels in math and reading in 2022

U.S. students in most states and across almost all demographic groups have experienced troubling setbacks in both math and reading, according to an authoritative national exam released on Monday, offering the most definitive indictment yet of the pandemic’s impact on millions of schoolchildren.In math, the results were especially devastating, representing the steepest declines ever recorded on the National Assessment of Educational Progress, known as the nation’s report card, which tests a broad sampling of fourth and eigh...

U.S. students in most states and across almost all demographic groups have experienced troubling setbacks in both math and reading, according to an authoritative national exam released on Monday, offering the most definitive indictment yet of the pandemic’s impact on millions of schoolchildren.

In math, the results were especially devastating, representing the steepest declines ever recorded on the National Assessment of Educational Progress, known as the nation’s report card, which tests a broad sampling of fourth and eighth graders and dates to the early 1990s.

In the test’s first results since the pandemic began, math scores for eighth graders fell in nearly every state. A meager 26 percent of eighth graders were proficient, down from 34 percent in 2019.

Fourth graders fared only slightly better, with declines in 41 states. Just 36 percent of fourth graders were proficient in math, down from 41 percent.

Reading scores also declined in more than half the states, continuing a downward trend that had begun even before the pandemic. No state showed sizable improvement in reading. And only about one in three students met proficiency standards, a designation that means students have demonstrated competency and are on track for future success.

And for the country’s most vulnerable students, the pandemic has left them even further behind. The drops in their test scores were often more pronounced, and their climbs to proficiency are now that much more daunting.

“I want to be very clear: The results in today’s nation’s report card are appalling and unacceptable,” said Miguel Cardona, the secretary of education. “This is a moment of truth for education. How we respond to this will determine not only our recovery, but our nation’s standing in the world.”

The exam, which is administered by federal officials and is considered more rigorous than many state tests, sampled nearly 450,000 fourth and eighth graders in more than 10,000 schools between January and March. The results are detailed for each state, as well as more than two dozen large school districts.

The findings raise significant questions about where the country goes from here. Last year, the federal government made its largest single investment in American schools — $123 billion, or about $2,400 per student — to help students catch up. School districts were required to spend at least 20 percent of the money on academic recovery, a threshold some experts believe is inadequate for the magnitude of the problem.

More on U.S. Schools and Education

With the funding slated to expire in 2024, research suggests that it could take billions more dollars and several years for students to properly recover.

The test results could be seized as political fodder — just before the midterms — to re-litigate the debate over how long schools should have stayed closed, an issue that galvanized many parents and teachers.

The bleak results underscored how closing schools hurt students, but researchers cautioned against drawing fast conclusions about whether states where schools stayed remote for longer had significantly worse results.

Decisions about how long to keep schools closed often varied even within states, depending on the local school district and virus transmission rates. And other factors, such as poverty levels and a state’s specific education policies, may also influence results.

The picture was mixed, and performance varied by grade level and subject matter in ways that were not always clear cut.

For example, Texas, where many schools opened sooner, held steady in reading but posted declines similar to national averages in math.

In California, which stood out for its caution in reopening schools, scores declined slightly less than national averages in several categories — about in line with Florida, which was a leader in opening schools sooner. Los Angeles stayed closed longer than almost anywhere else in the country, according to data by Burbio, a school tracking site, yet it was the only place to show significant gains in eighth-grade reading.

“Comparing states is tricky and people will likely go to red state, blue state, which is not the most helpful framing,” said Sean Reardon, a professor of education at Stanford University who is conducting a deeper analysis to try to come to more definitive answers.

Students today are still performing better than they did 30 years ago in math. For the last decade, math scores had held steady, with small fluctuations here and there.

But this year, that stability was shattered.

In eighth-grade math, the average score fell in all but one state. Seventeen states and the District of Columbia experienced double-digit drops, including higher-performing states like Massachusetts and New Jersey, and lower-performing states like Oklahoma and New Mexico. Utah was the only state where the eighth-grade math declines were not deemed statistically significant.

Places like Delaware, Maryland and Washington, D.C., fell by double digits in both fourth- and eighth-grade math.

The scores for older students were particularly concerning because “eighth grade is that gateway to more advanced mathematical course taking,” said Peggy Carr, commissioner of the National Center for Education Statistics, the research arm of the Department of Education, which administers the exam. She said students may be missing foundational skills in algebra and geometry, which would be needed in high school and for future careers in math and science.

For example, compared with 2019, fewer eighth graders could measure the length of a diagonal of a rectangle, or convert miles to yards.

Reading was less affected, perhaps, in part, because students received more help from parents during the pandemic.

Matthew Chingos, who directs the Center on Education Data and Policy at the Urban Institute, a research group, said the national results are consistent with other data that suggests math scores, in general, tend to be more dependent on what is being taught in school, whereas reading scores can also be driven by “what happens in the home.”

Still, reading was not spared, and in both grades, more than half the states saw significant declines. In 2019, reading scores had also declined in many states.

A Sharp Drop, a Wider Gap

The pandemic laid bare the deep and troubling inequalities that dominate many aspects of American life — especially in education.

In fourth grade, for both math and reading, students in the bottom 25th percentile lost more ground compared with students at the top of their class, leaving the low-performing students further behind.

And Black and Hispanic students, who started out behind white and Asian peers, experienced sharper declines than those groups in fourth-grade math.

Black and Hispanic students are more likely to attend schools segregated in poverty, and those schools stayed remote for longer than wealthier schools did during the pandemic, deepening divides.

The impact was especially stark for struggling students. In a survey included in the test, only half of fourth graders who were low performing in math said they had access to a computer at all times during the 2020-21 school year, compared with 80 percent of high-performing students.

Similarly, 70 percent said they had a quiet place to work at least some of the time, compared with 90 percent for high performers.

In one bright spot, most big city school districts, including New York City, Dallas and Miami-Dade, held steady in reading.

Raymond Hart, executive director of the Council of the Great City Schools, which works with 77 of the nation’s largest urban public school districts, saw it as a hopeful sign that the remedies districts put in place may be making a difference. “We believe recovery and rebound is possible for students,” he said.

But students in some districts like Cleveland and Memphis could afford to lose little ground. Many experience deep poverty and were already struggling entering the pandemic, yet they showed large declines this year across both grade levels and subjects.

In Detroit, where nearly one in two schoolchildren live in poverty, just 6 percent of fourth graders were proficient in math in 2019. This year, that number fell to 3 percent.

Now What?

Test scores are not the only factors that matter for a child’s future, but research has documented the importance of academic preparedness, starting early.

Students who do not read well in elementary school are more likely to drop out of high school, or not graduate on time. And ninth grade — where eighth graders who took the test in the spring are now — is considered a critical year for setting students up to graduate high school and attend college.

“We need to be doing something to target our resources better at those students who have been just historically underserved,” said Denise Forte, the interim chief executive at the Education Trust, which focuses on closing gaps for disadvantaged students.

Much of the nation’s hope for recovery rests on the billions of dollars in pandemic aid. But districts were given wide latitude for spending the money.

“Many districts do not have a concerted plan for math,” said Marguerite Roza, the director of the Edunomics Lab at Georgetown University, who is tracking pandemic relief spending. She is among those who believe that districts will need to spend more than 20 percent of their relief money on academic recovery.

One option, research suggests, is simply more time. Frequent small-group tutoring and doubling up on math classes are among the strategies that have shown promise.

Kevin Huffman, a former education commissioner in Tennessee who is now the chief executive of Accelerate, a nonprofit focused on tutoring, urged leaders to set aside finger pointing about what went wrong during the pandemic, and instead make a “moral commitment” to helping students recover.

“We cannot, as a country, declare that 2019 was the pinnacle of American education,” he said.

Aging mobile home park may be solution for affordable housing in York, SC

York County Councilmember Bump Roddey said affordable housing is a major need in York County, and he sees the start of a solution in this project.YORK, S.C. — York County Council is looking at allowing a developer to turn an aging mobile home park into a 400-home community, with the promise prices will stay affordable to help families out.The proposed project is on ...

York County Councilmember Bump Roddey said affordable housing is a major need in York County, and he sees the start of a solution in this project.

YORK, S.C. — York County Council is looking at allowing a developer to turn an aging mobile home park into a 400-home community, with the promise prices will stay affordable to help families out.

The proposed project is on McAfee Court in York, where there are about 40 mobile homes. Virgie Cherry, a resident of 16 years, said she wishes it would be maintained better.

“All this garbage out here," Cherry said. "These people don’t like cleaning yards."

High grass, trash, unpaved roads and some homes on the brink of collapse are just some of the complaints from residents on McAfee Court, many of whom can’t afford to leave the aging mobile home community.

But a new proposal to replace these homes with space for 400 new manufactured homes by Bull Creek LLC is bringing hope to some.

RELATED: 'It's a very difficult market' | Housing program uses incentives for property owners to help make housing more affordable

Richard Gee with Bull Creek LLC said families already living in the community would be the first to get a chance to buy a home and rent land in the new development.

Gee said right now many residents are paying around $1,000 to live here. Under his proposal, the cost for housing would stay under $1,500 a month but with better conditions.

“I can ensure that it’s clean, it’s picked up, it’s safe," Gee said. "Sidewalks, paved roads, streetlights, streetlamps, amenities.”

Most importantly, Gee said it would be affordable -- something that is very much needed in this community.

As more families turn to manufactured homes as a solution for affordable housing, demand has pushed prices up. According to census data, nationally the price of manufactured homes rose by nearly 50% during the pandemic.

Resident Vincent Maloco said he supports the project if it means his family can have a home.

WCNC Charlotte is always asking "where's the money?" If you need help, reach out to WCNC Charlotte by emailing money@wcnc.com.

“A proposal like this one would give 400 families an opportunity to start the American dream," Maloco said.

York County Councilmember Bump Roddey said affordable housing is a major need in York County, and he sees the start of a solution in this project.

“I think this plan totally fits what we want to see in our backyard as opposed to some of the rundown and dilapidated mobile units that are here now," Roddey said.

The first reading was approved by the county council this week. Council will discuss the project again next month.

Soon-to-be-acquired York County water utility looking to start new project ... in York County

Blue Granite Water is looking to start a new water and sewer project in Lake Wylie. That’s notable for two reasons.One reason is that York County is about to acquire Blue Granite through condemnation, after many months of negotiations and a history of complaints about high water bills from many of the utility’s 4,000 customers in the northern end of York County.The second reason is that Blue Granite is asking the state Public ...

Blue Granite Water is looking to start a new water and sewer project in Lake Wylie. That’s notable for two reasons.

One reason is that York County is about to acquire Blue Granite through condemnation, after many months of negotiations and a history of complaints about high water bills from many of the utility’s 4,000 customers in the northern end of York County.

The second reason is that Blue Granite is asking the state Public Services Commission to waive any public hearing on the new project – something that caught the attention of U.S. Rep. Ralph Norman (R-5th), whose office has fielded calls about Blue Granite for at least three years. Norman Thursday filed a formal letter with the PSC questioning why Blue Granite wants to build without public input.

“I am not asking [PSC] to deny Blue Granite’s request for approval without proper cause,” Norman wrote. “However, given that the taxpayers will be paying $36 million to acquire Blue Granite’s soon-to-be-condemned system in Lake Wylie, I find it curious that this company now seeks to forego public notice on a new endeavor in that same area.”

In an email response to South Carolina Public Radio, Blue Granite said: “We are seeking a waiver because it is new construction, there are no current customers, and as a result, no one to specifically ‘notice.’”

The utility will continue operating the water system that the county will acquire until the deal is finalized – which is expected to happen upon third reading of the ordinance at the next York County Council meeting in October, according to Greg Suskin, spokesperson for York County. The County Council has unanimously approved the acquisition on both the first and second readings.

York County officials have previously stated that the approximately 4,000 Blue Granite customers it will acquire should expect a roughly $50-per-month surcharge to help pay for the deal, but that customers should also expect their monthly bills to drop enough for that surcharge to be at least partially offset.

Blue Granite said in its statement that it is “disappointed in York County’s decision to acquire our Lake Wylie system via the exercise of eminent domain,” but will “remain committed to providing excellent service to our South Carolina customers and continuing to invest in the systems that provide them with safe, reliable water and wastewater services. It is our intent to follow all of the processes required to make this transition seamless to our current Lake Wylie customers.”

The next York County Council meeting is scheduled for Oct. 3.

Former York County SC jail detention officer charged with inmate sexual misconduct

A former South Carolina detention officer at the York County jail has been charged with misconduct after alleged sexual activity with an inmate, officials said.Benjamin Adam Skidell, 33, of Clover, was arrested Monday morning and booked into the jail in York where he used to work, arrest and jail records show....

A former South Carolina detention officer at the York County jail has been charged with misconduct after alleged sexual activity with an inmate, officials said.

Benjamin Adam Skidell, 33, of Clover, was arrested Monday morning and booked into the jail in York where he used to work, arrest and jail records show.

Skidell is charged with second-degree sexual misconduct with an inmate or patient, and misconduct in office, according to jail records and a statement from the State Law Enforcement Division.

Skidell is accused of illegal sexual activity with an inmate between May and November of 2020, according to SLED arrest warrants obtained by The Herald.

The arrest warrants said there was video surveillance from the jail, along with statements and other evidence, that was used as probable cause for the arrest of Skidell.

The warrants state that Skidell was working as a detention officer at the jail in 2020 at the time of the incidents.

York County Sheriff’s Office spokesman Trent Faris confirmed to The Herald that Skidell used to work at the York County Detention Center in the Moss Justice Center in York.

The detention center is operated by the sheriff’s office. Detention center employees work for the sheriff’s office, Faris said. In South Carolina, each sheriff in all 46 counties operates a county jail.

The sheriff’s office asked SLED to investigate after allegations were made in November 2020, Faris said.

Skidell was suspended after the allegations were made in November 2020, then fired in December 2020, the sheriff’s office said in a statement Monday.

York County Sheriff Kevin Tolson said in a statement the allegations are against the professional and accountability standards his employees are sworn to uphold.

“These allegations, if proven true are disturbing, but are not indicative of the great work of all the men and women do on a daily basis at the York County Detention Center,” Tolson said. “This incident has tarnished those values we hold dear.”

Because Skidell used to work for law enforcement in York County, the case will be prosecuted by the 7th Circuit Solicitor’s Office, which covers Spartanburg and Cherokee counties, SLED officials said.

Skidell was given an $8,000 bond after a first court appearance Monday, records show.

The second-degree sexual misconduct with an inmate charge carries up to five years for a conviction, South Carolina law states. Misconduct charge carries up to a year in prison for a conviction, under South Carolina law.

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