Skip to main content

Wedding & Event Venue Near Allendale, SC.

Platform Lifts-phone-nuber864-980-8004

Wedding Consultation

Your Magic Moment Awaits

Your wedding day. Without a doubt, it's one of the most significant events you will ever experience - when you and the love of your life officially seal the deal and get married. On this day, your friends and family will gather to celebrate the next step in your life. Photographers will be running around snapping photos, catering plates delicious food for guests to enjoy, and the DJ sets the mood for a night of fun and libation. You've worked extra hard to make everything look perfect and run smoothly. You have examined every moving part down to the tiniest detail. At the center of all your effort is your wedding venue in Allendale, SC.

Your event space can mean the difference between an unforgettable event and an average occasion. Capturing your uniqueness as a couple is paramount to a memorable wedding. But, without the right venue location and staff, your unforgettable event can turn into a painfully average occasion. Fortunately, at Abney Hall, you won't ever have to worry about dingy reception spaces and crummy chow halls.

Constructed in Allendale, SC, in 1962, Abney Hall is 15,000 square feet and sits on 500 acres of land, making it a large wedding venue unlike any other. Abney Hall was originally the home of Mrs. Josephine Abney, a Allendale native who was a lifelong philanthropist. Mrs. Abney devoted much of her time and effort towards supporting charities, educational institutions, hospitals, and other noble efforts. Today, Abney Hall stands tall as a symbol of love, both in our community and for the couples who choose to get married here.

Abney Hall is an exclusive event experience unlike any other, surrounded by verdant forests and sparkling ponds. Our venue is a natural fit for several occasions, including:

Special Event Space Allendale, SC

Weddings

 Event Venue Allendale, SC

Bridal Showers

 Event Space Allendale, SC

Bridal Portraits

 Rehearsal Dinner Venue Allendale, SC

Rehearsal Dinners

 Bridal Shower Venue Allendale, SC

Corporate Events

 Business Event Space Allendale, SC

Much More!

 Wedding Space Allendale, SC

The Top Wedding Venue in Allendale, SC

The beginning of your life starts at Abney Hall. With our team by your side, we can create the fairy tale wedding you have dreamed about since childhood. Whether you have 100 guests or 1,000, our waterfront ceremony locations and French-inspired courtyard are perfect for your big day. Celebrate in luxurious style surrounded by shady magnolia trees, a private forest, large ponds, and the beauty of Mother Nature. While our venue location and aesthetic have been praised far and wide, so too have the practical aspects of Abney Hall. Looking for a relaxing, comfortable spot for your bridal party to get ready in? We offer an entire floor in the Abney Hall residence to get the bridal party ready. Want to make your groomsman feel extra-special too? We've got a private, plush house just feet from a sparkling pond that is a proper hangout spot for the guys in your group.

To make life easier on you, we also offer Abney Hall as your go-to spot for rehearsal dinners. Why book an expensive restaurant or travel to another location when unmatched beauty and convenience are right at your fingertips? Abney Hall is just the place for that very important dinner the night before your big day. We are also happy to host your bridal shower at Abney Hall. Our venue makes for one of Allendale's most unique bridal shower settings, where your family and friends can gather to give gifts and be merry before you walk down the aisle.

With such a large, magnificent house and a vast property, Abney Hall also makes for an unforgettable location for your bridal portraits and other wedding-related photography needs. Don't take our word for it - book a tour and see for yourself why so many new brides and grooms choose Abney Hall as their wedding venue in Allendale.

 Wedding Venue Allendale, SC

What Sets Abney Hall Apart from Other Wedding Venues in Allendale?

You've already found the person you want to spend the rest of your life beside. The next step? Finding the perfect wedding venue for your ceremony, reception, and celebration of your lifelong commitment to one another. Remember, the backdrop for photos, dancing, eating, and all other activities will be at your wedding venue. That's why we work so hard to set Abney Hall apart from our competitors - so you and your guests can focus on love and living your new life while we work with your vendors and photographers to make your magic night a reality.

Here are just a few reasons why guests choose Abney Hall as their wedding venue in Allendale, SC, along with some helpful tips from our experienced wedding venue staff:

Venue Size

Choosing the appropriate-sied venue for your desired guest count is a critical decision. A venue's capacity affects the number of people you need to consider having at your ceremony and reception. As you're first starting out, we recommend having a guest count in mind as you're searching for the right venue. Try to stick with that number. You may fall in love with a particular venue, but if its max capacity can't accommodate your guest count, it may be time to cross them off your list.

 Corporate Conference Hall Allendale, SC
Abney Hall Pro Tip

Abney Hall Pro Tip:

Keep in mind that this is your big day. You shouldn't feel obligated to invite the college roommate you shared a dorm with for one semester. At the end of the day, your wedding venue should be one that can accommodate those closest to you. Abney Hall is equipped for both small and large weddings, consisting of 500 acres of forest, ponds, and lush natural beauty. Whether you want an intimate wedding with only your best friends or a grand ceremony with hundreds of people, we have the right amount of room to make you comfortable.

Location and Nearby Lodging

On your big day, you're likely to have friends and family traveling in from other parts of the state or country. These folks will need a place to stay during and even after your wedding. Accessibility and ease are important factors when it comes to choosing your wedding venue for both you and your guests.

Located in Allendale, SC, Abney Hall is situated in a memorable, natural setting, giving your wedding a private vibe in the midst of Mother Nature. While we pride ourselves on having a secluded wedding event space, our venue is within an easy driving distance of hotels and vacation rentals.

Abney Hall Pro Tip

Abney Hall Pro Tip:

When you contact us for a tour, make sure to speak with our experienced venue manager about nearby hotels and shuttle service options. We understand that your guest's comfort and convenience are important, and we're happy to work with you to figure out the best way to get your guests to Abney Hall.

Venue Staff

At Abney Hall, our staff has earned its reputation as one of the industry's most friendly, accessible teams. We will provide you with a purpose-minded point of contact that can help answer questions relating to timelines, preferred vendors, and every aspect of your wedding. When you tour our wedding venue in Allendale, SC, for the first time, we want you to feel like you have all the information you need to make an informed purchasing decision.

We would be happy to go over:
  • Venue Pricing
  • Ceremony Specifics
  • Reception Specifics
  • Catering Possibilities
  • Decorating Possibilities
  • Entertainment Options
  • Photography and Photo Opportunities
  • Venue Amenities
  • Bridal Party Needs
  • Groomsman Needs

At Abney Hall, our goal is to be your first resource when it comes to setting up and coordinating the details of your wedding day.

Decor

When it comes to your wedding's decor, you probably already have a few ideas in mind. We love it when our brides and grooms have a vision in mind because one of our greatest joys is turning that vision into a reality. At Abney Hall, our team is available to help you and your decorator fit, accent, and accommodate your fairy-tale wedding - whatever that may be.

Are you looking to dress up your wedding with decorations galore? Just want to add a few accents that tie into your preferred color palette? Abney Hall is versatile and ready to help however we are able.

 Reception Hall Allendale, SC
Abney-Hall-Pro-Tip

Abney Hall Pro Tip:

If you're thinking about bringing in your own greenery, lighting, floral pieces, and more, we recommend discussing your vision with us on your initial tour of our event space. That way, we can get a head start on making your big day exactly how you envision it.

Photo Opportunities

10 years from now, when you and your spouse are celebrating your anniversary, you will pull out photographs from your wedding and will reminisce about the unforgettable time you spent at Abney Hall. Your wedding photos will be with you forever, and as such, we work closely with you and your photographer to suggest extra-special photo op spots that you can only find on Abney Hall grounds.

From the grand staircase and French-inspired courtyard to our manicured gardens and lovely pond, there is no shortage of photo-op locations for your photographer to choose from. As one of the most popular wedding venues in Allendale, SC, we have worked with dozens of photographers over the years.

Our experience has allowed us to cultivate a list of preferred photographers - all of whom have the talent to take your pictures to the next level in a setting they're familiar with. We encourage you to check out our gallery to get a sense of the scope of our wedding venue and gain inspiration from other happy couples.

Abney-Hall-Pro-Tip

Abney Hall Pro Tip

The gallery on our website is extensive but be sure to check out our Facebook and Instagram pages as well. We keep our social pages updated with recent wedding photographs, giving you an incredible resource that you can use for your own photography purposes.

Special Event Space Allendale, SC

The Premier Corporate Event Venue in Allendale, SC

Abney Hall is known across the United States for our stunning weddings, but we also play host to some of the largest corporate events in South Carolina. Why choose a bland, lifeless meeting space when you can enjoy the beauty of Mother Nature coupled with a professional atmosphere? If you have an important team-building event or corporate conference that you have to coordinate, look no further than Abney Hall.

The epitome of class and style, our corporate event space is large, lavish, and chock-full of onsite amenities for you and your co-workers to enjoy. If your team needs a morale boost, don't bring them to the local Olive Garden for a cheap lunch. Treat them to a refreshing experience in our main dining room, where we can work with you to incorporate your catering options with the goals of your event.

When the hard work is done, and your team needs a breather, what better way to relax than with a quick dip in our pool? To burn off a little steam, head over to our brand-new tennis court - the perfect place to get some exercise in an ultra-private setting while you enjoy the sights and sounds of nature. Don't forget to bring your fishing poles for a couple of hours of fishing. There's even an opportunity to go hunting if you wish.

 Event Venue Allendale, SC

Elegance at Its Finest - Only
a Phone Call Away

If you're ready to learn more about Abney Hall as your wedding venue, don't hesitate to reach out. We would love to hear more about your plans, your vision, and your needs. We know that planning a wedding isn't easy. It takes time, attention to detail, and a whole lot of patience. Our goal is to help provide you with all the info you need to learn more about our venue. Once you decide on a date, we'll work closely with you and your vendors to craft a wedding experience that you will treasure for the rest of your life.

Our available dates for your big day are going quick, especially during peak seasons like spring and fall. We look forward to hearing from you soon!

Contact us today for a FREE initial consultation
 Event Space Allendale, SC

Latest News in Allendale, SC

State withholding $6.1 million from Williamsburg County for late annual financial report

WILLIAMSBURG COUNTY, S.C. (WCSC) - Out of South Carolina’s 46 counties, three have failed to meet the January 1 deadline to report financial statements to the Comptroller General’s office, as required by state law.The counties include Allendale, Orangeburg and Williamsburg in the Lowcountry.But the state can withhold funding set for distribution to those delinquent counties. Comptroller General Richard Eckstrom reports his office has more than $36 million on hold until they provide the required audits.Broken ...

WILLIAMSBURG COUNTY, S.C. (WCSC) - Out of South Carolina’s 46 counties, three have failed to meet the January 1 deadline to report financial statements to the Comptroller General’s office, as required by state law.

The counties include Allendale, Orangeburg and Williamsburg in the Lowcountry.

But the state can withhold funding set for distribution to those delinquent counties. Comptroller General Richard Eckstrom reports his office has more than $36 million on hold until they provide the required audits.

Broken down, it’s $2.7 million for Allendale, $17 million for Orangeburg and another $6.1 million for Williamsburg.

“I sympathize with the counties, [they] have a lot of work going on. But they ought to be able to plan for that work and what we see is that there are some counties that wait until the bitter end to start doing work, which is a is a huge mistake,” Eckstrom said. “It’s like waiting for a house fire before you check to see if you have the hoses or water pressure, you know the time to prepare for a house fire before that fire ignites.”

Supervisor Tiffany Cooks says it’s been a hectic ordeal attempting to meet this year’s deadline. That’s because the county uses an outside firm to complete its financial audits, and in 2021 they had to find a new firm to take on the job.

That firm, Love Bailey & Associates, wrote a letter last month explaining the delay was due to not being chosen until late October 2021, and a busy tax season.

Cooks says the county had to go through an RFP process and get council approval to hire the firm.

The county is also undergoing a switch to a new software.

“They’re at the mercy of a public accounting firm to set the time aside. This is not profitable work for CPA firms. Government work, it doesn’t pay as well as commercial work does and as a result of that some government clients get put off by a CPA firm until the CPA firm has time,” Eckstrom said. “Those counties really shortchange themselves, I think, in having to rely as heavily as they do on an outside accounting firm to do work for them.”

It’s unclear what exactly that $6.1 million is for. Cooks says it is not entirely for the county’s general fund, if so, the county wouldn’t be able to survive.

Eckstrom says reporting on time helps county councils set their budgets and keeps government operations transparent to the public. Without the state’s deadline, there might be no accountability.

He reports that last year, Williamsburg did not provide its financial statements until May as well.

The year before that, it was more than two months late.

Allendale has also been a “persistent late reporter” according to Eckstrom.

“If a county is unable to do it at all that county really runs a very, very high risk. That money’s going out the door somehow that shouldn’t be. And we’ve seen that happen, in Allendale,” Eckstrom said.

In an email written to Supervisor Cooks on Thursday, financial officer Liz Nelson reports that while the county’s finances have been strained, they have been “staying on top of our finances through weekly and monthly cash flow planning and analysis along with implementing and approving emergency spending only during the past quarter.”

Nelson reports they should have their full financial audit submitted by the end of next week.

Cooks also says she’s received council approval to hire a recruiting firm after Nelson retires this year.

She’s hopeful they can hire an in-house CPA to set things on track for the next financial audit season.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

South Carolina spending hundreds of millions of dollars help schools with aging infrastructure

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - As the Saluda County School District educates future generation of Tigers, schools like Saluda Elementary are hampered by aging infrastructure of the past.For starters, there’s the tight cafeteria that can barely squeeze in five classes at lunchtime, the wires held up by zip ties in the hallways, and the boiler rooms that flood with a good rain.The oldest part of the building went up in 1950, and staff say it is well past its prime.“The infrastructure is to the point now that it&rsqu...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - As the Saluda County School District educates future generation of Tigers, schools like Saluda Elementary are hampered by aging infrastructure of the past.

For starters, there’s the tight cafeteria that can barely squeeze in five classes at lunchtime, the wires held up by zip ties in the hallways, and the boiler rooms that flood with a good rain.

The oldest part of the building went up in 1950, and staff say it is well past its prime.

“The infrastructure is to the point now that it’s almost impossible to upgrade our facilities to be cost-effective right now,” Saluda Superintendent Dr. Harvey Livingston said.

But in Saluda County, the tax base isn’t there to afford major renovations and construction, a problem that plagues school districts in South Carolina’s poorer, rural areas.

“A millage tax in some of our poorest counties only brings in $20,000, and in our richest counties, it brings in $2 million,” South Carolina Superintendent of Education Molly Spearman said. “So you can tell how difficult it is to build a school.”

Now the state Department of Education is spending hundreds of millions of dollars to help these schools out.

The department worked with the state’s Revenue and Fiscal Affairs Office to rank every school district based on need, using their per capita incomes, index of tax-paying ability of the school district, and index of tax-paying ability of the county.

It found those with the most need, in order, were Allendale, Bamberg 2, Dillon 3 (Latta), Bamberg 1, Lee, Barnwell 19 (Blackville-Hilda), Barnwell 29 (Williston-Elko), Saluda, Dillon 4, and Hampton. Beginning July 1, the two Bamberg districts will be consolidated, as will the two Barnwell districts.

Spearman’s staff looked at those 10 districts first, then expanded it to the 25 neediest, and consulted vendors to assess school facilities to determine how the state will distribute money.

“We will go right up the list in those and looking at our top-priority need. Now this is not taking care of everything in those districts, but we are trying to help on their No. 1 priority need in facilities,” Spearman said, adding the cost to make infrastructure fixes in every South Carolina school is “well over $1 billion, probably closer to $2 billion.”

So far, more than $15 million is heading to Dillon 3 and 4, and on Thursday, the department announced $38 million will go to Saluda schools.

“$38 million is going to go a tremendous way to improve our facilities in Saluda County Schools. We’re a poor, rural district, do not have a very strong tax base, so every dime we can get from the state is going to be huge for us,” Livingston said following the announcement at Saluda Elementary, where he was joined Spearman, district staff, school board members, and members of the Saluda County delegation in the General Assembly.

The Department of Education has received $100 million from the General Assembly in the current state budget for these projects, and it is allocating $40 million of its remaining pandemic relief money from the federal government toward them as well.

While lawmakers are still finalizing the next budget, Spearman said they anticipate receiving at least another $100 million next year, an appropriation that could be as much as $150 million.

“It has been 70 years since we’ve done anything of this significance,” Spearman said.

In Saluda County, their plan includes tearing down the elementary school and combining it with the nearby primary school into a new K-5 school with a new building. With their $38 million, leaders also have their sights set on building a new wing at Hollywood Elementary School and constructing a career and technology wing at Saluda Middle School and Saluda High School.

To receive this money from the state, districts have to get on board with potential consolidations the Department of Education calls for and put some of their own money in as well. Those dollars could come from a bond referendum on the ballot, money districts have obtained in federal pandemic relief, or elsewhere.

Districts also must select a building design from among the prototype plans narrowed down by the Department of Education, which Spearman said will keep them from having to spend additional money on architectural plans.

Livingston said it’ll be worth it for the county’s students and its taxpayers.

“Our students deserve the same opportunities and same buildings that students across the state have, and this $38 million will just make a world of difference for our students for generations to come,” he said.

Spearman, who is not running for re-election this year as state superintendent, believes these appropriations from the General Assembly should be recurring and has proposed the state establish an “infrastructure bank” from which districts could borrow money for school infrastructure projects.

“Some could pay it back; some may not be able to pay it back,” she said. “But it would be a revolving fund that’s not just for the poorest districts in the state because the fast-growing districts have a tremendous burden too.”

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Allendale County Man Charged With Dog-Fighting

A Fairfax man was charged Wednesday with animal fighting and ill treatment of animals — both felonies — after a South Carolina Law Enforcement Division investigation led to the discovery of “pit bull type dogs” on his property that had scarring on their faces, ears, necks and front legs, according to a news release.Dwayne Loadholt, 43, is accused of owning at least one dog for the purpose of fighting or “baiting” and not providing adequate shelter, water or medical care to his dogs....

A Fairfax man was charged Wednesday with animal fighting and ill treatment of animals — both felonies — after a South Carolina Law Enforcement Division investigation led to the discovery of “pit bull type dogs” on his property that had scarring on their faces, ears, necks and front legs, according to a news release.

Dwayne Loadholt, 43, is accused of owning at least one dog for the purpose of fighting or “baiting” and not providing adequate shelter, water or medical care to his dogs.

The dogs were brought to the attention of investigators when an Allendale County Sheriff’s Office deputy responded to a call for service Tuesday at Loadholt’s property after receiving complaints about animals being mistreated there. These complaints had also been made in the past.

The sheriff’s office requested the assistance of SLED.

*****

DON’T MISS A STORY …

*****

A search warrant was issued and investigators found the dogs with the scarring, as well as injectable antibiotics, which is associated with dog-fighting operations. Also found were “numerous pedigrees for the bloodlines of dogs.”

According to two arrest warrants, Loadholt knowingly deprived the dogs of “necessary sustenance and shelter.”

“Further, dogs on the property had eye infections, visible oozing wounds … dogs were fixed to heavy chains staked into the ground.”

The dogs’ shelter was damaged and the dogs had no water within the “limited travel” of the length of the chains to which they were tied.

A news release from SLED did not say whether agents seized the dogs.

Loadholt was booked at Allendale County Detention Center on Wednesday and released on a $5,000 surety bond.

The 14th Circuit Solicitor’s Officer will prosecute the case.

If convicted, Loadholt faces a fine of up to $5,000 and up to five years imprisonment for the fighting charge and not less than 180 days — and up to five years — imprisonment for the abuse charge, as well as a $5,000 charge.

*****

(SPONSORED CONTENT)

(Via: Provided)

Liz Farrell is the new executive editor at FITSNews. She was named 2018’s top columnist in the state by South Carolina Press Association and is back after taking a nearly two-year break from corporate journalism to reclaim her soul. Email her at liz@fitsnews.com or tweet her @ElizFarrell.

*****

Got something you’d like to say in response to one of our articles? Or an issue you’d like to address proactively? We have an open microphone policy here at FITSNews! Submit your letter to the editor (or guest column) via email HERE. Got a tip for a story? CLICK HERE. Got a technical question or a glitch to report? CLICK HERE.

SOUTH CAROLINA’S LATEST NEWS IN YOUR INBOX …

Three injuries reported after tornado rips through Allendale

ALLENDALE, S.C. (WIS) – On Wednesday families in Allendale County were picking up the pieces after a tornado ripped through the area on Tuesday, leaving significant damage.According to the South Carolina Emergency Division, three non-life-threatening injuries have been reported.The American Red Cross of South Carolina is currently assisting 15 families after the tornado impacted their ho...

ALLENDALE, S.C. (WIS) – On Wednesday families in Allendale County were picking up the pieces after a tornado ripped through the area on Tuesday, leaving significant damage.

According to the South Carolina Emergency Division, three non-life-threatening injuries have been reported.

The American Red Cross of South Carolina is currently assisting 15 families after the tornado impacted their homes.

Representative Justin Bamberg has asked that Governor Henry McMaster declare a state of emergency in Allendale and Bamberg counties.

Officials say four homes were destroyed, five homes had major damage and six homes had minor damage. More damage assessments will be done Wednesday.

Eletha Kearse, who lives in Ulmer, suffered damage to her trailer, and is praising God because she said it could have been much worse.

As a tornado ripped through the county, Kearse was watching coverage on TV until it came to her doorstep.

“I’m letting everybody else know what the storm was doing, and not knowing not that the storm was headed our way,” she said. “Next thing you know lights went off, next thing you know I heard a sound over my trailer. And I said ‘Lord, it done hit.’ And all I could do was just pray and cry and just ask the Lord just to cover us.”

Half of her awning got blown to the other side of the home.

The window of Kearse’s car got smashed by a refrigerator that was outside. She credits her carport for stopping the fridge from being picked up and thrown on top her home.

There’s also a leak on inside, and she didn’t have power until 7am this morning.

“We could’ve been gone yesterday but God spared our life because as you know, a trailer don’t stand a chance on a tornado, that’s just like a piece of paper,” she said. “So like I said, I am truly blessed. My daughter and my niece are truly blessed today because we’re alive and this is my testimony that I can tell people, do not take a tornado for a joke because it is real.”

Surveying storm damage across the county on Wednesday, WIS found trees ripped up and downed power lines on multiple roads.

WIS also found metal tanks rolled across fields on Railroad Ave. in Allendale, and cars smothered by fallen trees.

There were also collapsed silos on farms, and all sheet metal crumpled like aluminum foil.

Amid the wreckage, Kearse found perspective.

“Like I tell people, my trailer and my car are material things, but God spared our life yesterday and that’s a blessing,” she said.

Allendale County Schools were closed on Wednesday, and will be closed again on Thursday.

Allendale-Fairfax Elementary School was used as a shelter on Tuesday night following the storm.

The Red Cross tells WIS that it’s unclear at this point if the school will be reopened as a shelter on Wednesday night.

Per SCEMD, those wanting to help Allendale County residents affected by the recent storm in Allendale County can make donations of non-perishable food and cleaning supplies. You can do that by calling 803-584-4556 or 706-360-0443.

#Allendale residents who are safe in their houses need to stay home & off the roads.Emergency responders are answering calls rights now.They need the roads cleared of other drivers as they work around debris and help those in need of help.If you have an emergency, call 911. pic.twitter.com/nxk2kVr0Nt

— SCEMD (@SCEMD) April 5, 2022

SCEMD tweeted these photos after the storm Tuesday.

Copyright 2022 WIS. All rights reserved.

Notice a spelling or grammar error in this article? Click or tap here to report it. Please include the article’s headline.

ANIMAL CONNECTION: Rescue after hours

Rescue work in not a 9-5 job. Most people who work in animal rescue understand that animals need help even outside of typical business hours. We were reminded of that last Tuesday, May 24 when we received a call for help at 5:30 p.m.Just when we thought our day was over, the call meant that our day was actually just beginning. Law enforcement were on scene at a property in Allendale with more than 20 dogs chained up behind a house. A state and federal seizure of the dogs was in progress and they had no safe place to take the dogs. The...

Rescue work in not a 9-5 job. Most people who work in animal rescue understand that animals need help even outside of typical business hours. We were reminded of that last Tuesday, May 24 when we received a call for help at 5:30 p.m.

Just when we thought our day was over, the call meant that our day was actually just beginning. Law enforcement were on scene at a property in Allendale with more than 20 dogs chained up behind a house. A state and federal seizure of the dogs was in progress and they had no safe place to take the dogs. The Allendale County Animal Shelter has 17 kennels and all of them were full.

Several calls later and a team of five from the SPCA were on their way to Allendale with three vehicles. We arrived at the property close to dark and assessed the need. There were six puppies, some of whom were already kenneled together, so we were relieved that the math worked out – we could place 22 dogs in the 17 available kennels at the Allendale County Animal Shelter. We made the decision to house them all together at the Allendale County Animal Shelter so a vet could examine them all at one location.

All the adult dogs, and some of the puppies, were on heavy chains. They did not appear to have access to clean water and food. Some had dilapidated dog houses, but those were full of feces and filth. Others had turned over barrels which were supposed to serve as shelter from the elements. Most of the dogs were emaciated and covered in fleas. Many had open wounds and scarring. Beds, toys, treats – all the things you give your pet – were nowhere in sight.

We put emotion aside and went to work. Darkness fell upon us, but the work continued with flashlights and the headlights from the vehicles. No dog would be left behind. One by one, each dog was photographed, documented, numbered and loaded into a kennel in the SPCA vehicles.

Most of the chains had to be cut off with bolt cutters. Some people believe that dogs living in these conditions would be aggressive to people. It is actually quite the opposite. Every single one of the 22 dogs were friendly and freely giving out kisses to us. Could they sense that we were there to help them? The dogs were very tolerant of us handling them, even when we sometimes struggled to cut their thick chains off.

When the last chain was cut and the last dog loaded, it was after 10 p.m. A caravan of six vehicle drove down the country roads and arrived at the county shelter with Linda waiting to receive them. Linda is one of the unsung heroes of animal rescue and never complained about us arriving after 10 p.m. with 22 dogs. We worked until after 1 a.m. loading the dogs who were already at the shelter and replacing them with the 22 seized dogs.

When every dog was secure, we drove slowing back to the Albrecht Center, dodging deer and other animals on the way. When we pulled into the parking lot of the SPCA Albrecht Center, it was 2 a.m., but one would think it was 2 p.m. The parking lot was full of cars of those who came out in the middle of the night to help. This is the heart of rescue – those who are willing to help animals in need at 9 a.m., 9 p.m. or 2 a.m.

We were all back at the SPCA Albrecht Center the next day working to help make the new arrivals comfortable. We could not continue to help homeless animals without staff, fosters, volunteers, donors and supporters who sustain our life-saving work. Just as we got the 17 new adult dogs settled, and breathed a little sigh of relief, another call came Wednesday afternoon. Law enforcement needed help with eight more dogs in Allendale from an unrelated case.

Since the local shelter was full, we would have to bring those eight back to the Albrecht Center. Kennels, leashes, collars, flashlights, water, bowels, towels – all were loaded into the vehicles so we could do it all again. It was almost 5 p.m.

Never miss important news!

Get the important headlines that matter to Aiken and surrounding areas. Sign up for our newsletter today!

By submitting this form, you are consenting to receive marketing emails from: The Post and Courier, 148 Williman Street, Charleston, SC, 29403, US, https://www.postandcourier.com. You can revoke your consent to receive emails at any time by using the SafeUnsubscribe® link, found at the bottom of every email. Emails are serviced by Constant Contact.

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.