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Wedding & Event Venue Near Edgefield, SC.

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Your Magic Moment Awaits

Your wedding day. Without a doubt, it's one of the most significant events you will ever experience - when you and the love of your life officially seal the deal and get married. On this day, your friends and family will gather to celebrate the next step in your life. Photographers will be running around snapping photos, catering plates delicious food for guests to enjoy, and the DJ sets the mood for a night of fun and libation. You've worked extra hard to make everything look perfect and run smoothly. You have examined every moving part down to the tiniest detail. At the center of all your effort is your wedding venue in Edgefield, SC.

Your event space can mean the difference between an unforgettable event and an average occasion. Capturing your uniqueness as a couple is paramount to a memorable wedding. But, without the right venue location and staff, your unforgettable event can turn into a painfully average occasion. Fortunately, at Abney Hall, you won't ever have to worry about dingy reception spaces and crummy chow halls.

Constructed in Edgefield, SC, in 1962, Abney Hall is 15,000 square feet and sits on 500 acres of land, making it a large wedding venue unlike any other. Abney Hall was originally the home of Mrs. Josephine Abney, a Edgefield native who was a lifelong philanthropist. Mrs. Abney devoted much of her time and effort towards supporting charities, educational institutions, hospitals, and other noble efforts. Today, Abney Hall stands tall as a symbol of love, both in our community and for the couples who choose to get married here.

Abney Hall is an exclusive event experience unlike any other, surrounded by verdant forests and sparkling ponds. Our venue is a natural fit for several occasions, including:

Special Event Space Edgefield, SC

Weddings

 Event Venue Edgefield, SC

Bridal Showers

 Event Space Edgefield, SC

Bridal Portraits

 Rehearsal Dinner Venue Edgefield, SC

Rehearsal Dinners

 Bridal Shower Venue Edgefield, SC

Corporate Events

 Business Event Space Edgefield, SC

Much More!

 Wedding Space Edgefield, SC

The Top Wedding Venue in Edgefield, SC

The beginning of your life starts at Abney Hall. With our team by your side, we can create the fairy tale wedding you have dreamed about since childhood. Whether you have 100 guests or 1,000, our waterfront ceremony locations and French-inspired courtyard are perfect for your big day. Celebrate in luxurious style surrounded by shady magnolia trees, a private forest, large ponds, and the beauty of Mother Nature. While our venue location and aesthetic have been praised far and wide, so too have the practical aspects of Abney Hall. Looking for a relaxing, comfortable spot for your bridal party to get ready in? We offer an entire floor in the Abney Hall residence to get the bridal party ready. Want to make your groomsman feel extra-special too? We've got a private, plush house just feet from a sparkling pond that is a proper hangout spot for the guys in your group.

To make life easier on you, we also offer Abney Hall as your go-to spot for rehearsal dinners. Why book an expensive restaurant or travel to another location when unmatched beauty and convenience are right at your fingertips? Abney Hall is just the place for that very important dinner the night before your big day. We are also happy to host your bridal shower at Abney Hall. Our venue makes for one of Edgefield's most unique bridal shower settings, where your family and friends can gather to give gifts and be merry before you walk down the aisle.

With such a large, magnificent house and a vast property, Abney Hall also makes for an unforgettable location for your bridal portraits and other wedding-related photography needs. Don't take our word for it - book a tour and see for yourself why so many new brides and grooms choose Abney Hall as their wedding venue in Edgefield.

 Wedding Venue Edgefield, SC

What Sets Abney Hall Apart from Other Wedding Venues in Edgefield?

You've already found the person you want to spend the rest of your life beside. The next step? Finding the perfect wedding venue for your ceremony, reception, and celebration of your lifelong commitment to one another. Remember, the backdrop for photos, dancing, eating, and all other activities will be at your wedding venue. That's why we work so hard to set Abney Hall apart from our competitors - so you and your guests can focus on love and living your new life while we work with your vendors and photographers to make your magic night a reality.

Here are just a few reasons why guests choose Abney Hall as their wedding venue in Edgefield, SC, along with some helpful tips from our experienced wedding venue staff:

Venue Size

Choosing the appropriate-sied venue for your desired guest count is a critical decision. A venue's capacity affects the number of people you need to consider having at your ceremony and reception. As you're first starting out, we recommend having a guest count in mind as you're searching for the right venue. Try to stick with that number. You may fall in love with a particular venue, but if its max capacity can't accommodate your guest count, it may be time to cross them off your list.

 Corporate Conference Hall Edgefield, SC
Abney Hall Pro Tip

Abney Hall Pro Tip:

Keep in mind that this is your big day. You shouldn't feel obligated to invite the college roommate you shared a dorm with for one semester. At the end of the day, your wedding venue should be one that can accommodate those closest to you. Abney Hall is equipped for both small and large weddings, consisting of 500 acres of forest, ponds, and lush natural beauty. Whether you want an intimate wedding with only your best friends or a grand ceremony with hundreds of people, we have the right amount of room to make you comfortable.

Location and Nearby Lodging

On your big day, you're likely to have friends and family traveling in from other parts of the state or country. These folks will need a place to stay during and even after your wedding. Accessibility and ease are important factors when it comes to choosing your wedding venue for both you and your guests.

Located in Edgefield, SC, Abney Hall is situated in a memorable, natural setting, giving your wedding a private vibe in the midst of Mother Nature. While we pride ourselves on having a secluded wedding event space, our venue is within an easy driving distance of hotels and vacation rentals.

Abney Hall Pro Tip

Abney Hall Pro Tip:

When you contact us for a tour, make sure to speak with our experienced venue manager about nearby hotels and shuttle service options. We understand that your guest's comfort and convenience are important, and we're happy to work with you to figure out the best way to get your guests to Abney Hall.

Venue Staff

At Abney Hall, our staff has earned its reputation as one of the industry's most friendly, accessible teams. We will provide you with a purpose-minded point of contact that can help answer questions relating to timelines, preferred vendors, and every aspect of your wedding. When you tour our wedding venue in Edgefield, SC, for the first time, we want you to feel like you have all the information you need to make an informed purchasing decision.

We would be happy to go over:
  • Venue Pricing
  • Ceremony Specifics
  • Reception Specifics
  • Catering Possibilities
  • Decorating Possibilities
  • Entertainment Options
  • Photography and Photo Opportunities
  • Venue Amenities
  • Bridal Party Needs
  • Groomsman Needs

At Abney Hall, our goal is to be your first resource when it comes to setting up and coordinating the details of your wedding day.

Decor

When it comes to your wedding's decor, you probably already have a few ideas in mind. We love it when our brides and grooms have a vision in mind because one of our greatest joys is turning that vision into a reality. At Abney Hall, our team is available to help you and your decorator fit, accent, and accommodate your fairy-tale wedding - whatever that may be.

Are you looking to dress up your wedding with decorations galore? Just want to add a few accents that tie into your preferred color palette? Abney Hall is versatile and ready to help however we are able.

 Reception Hall Edgefield, SC
Abney-Hall-Pro-Tip

Abney Hall Pro Tip:

If you're thinking about bringing in your own greenery, lighting, floral pieces, and more, we recommend discussing your vision with us on your initial tour of our event space. That way, we can get a head start on making your big day exactly how you envision it.

Photo Opportunities

10 years from now, when you and your spouse are celebrating your anniversary, you will pull out photographs from your wedding and will reminisce about the unforgettable time you spent at Abney Hall. Your wedding photos will be with you forever, and as such, we work closely with you and your photographer to suggest extra-special photo op spots that you can only find on Abney Hall grounds.

From the grand staircase and French-inspired courtyard to our manicured gardens and lovely pond, there is no shortage of photo-op locations for your photographer to choose from. As one of the most popular wedding venues in Edgefield, SC, we have worked with dozens of photographers over the years.

Our experience has allowed us to cultivate a list of preferred photographers - all of whom have the talent to take your pictures to the next level in a setting they're familiar with. We encourage you to check out our gallery to get a sense of the scope of our wedding venue and gain inspiration from other happy couples.

Abney-Hall-Pro-Tip

Abney Hall Pro Tip

The gallery on our website is extensive but be sure to check out our Facebook and Instagram pages as well. We keep our social pages updated with recent wedding photographs, giving you an incredible resource that you can use for your own photography purposes.

Special Event Space Edgefield, SC

The Premier Corporate Event Venue in Edgefield, SC

Abney Hall is known across the United States for our stunning weddings, but we also play host to some of the largest corporate events in South Carolina. Why choose a bland, lifeless meeting space when you can enjoy the beauty of Mother Nature coupled with a professional atmosphere? If you have an important team-building event or corporate conference that you have to coordinate, look no further than Abney Hall.

The epitome of class and style, our corporate event space is large, lavish, and chock-full of onsite amenities for you and your co-workers to enjoy. If your team needs a morale boost, don't bring them to the local Olive Garden for a cheap lunch. Treat them to a refreshing experience in our main dining room, where we can work with you to incorporate your catering options with the goals of your event.

When the hard work is done, and your team needs a breather, what better way to relax than with a quick dip in our pool? To burn off a little steam, head over to our brand-new tennis court - the perfect place to get some exercise in an ultra-private setting while you enjoy the sights and sounds of nature. Don't forget to bring your fishing poles for a couple of hours of fishing. There's even an opportunity to go hunting if you wish.

 Event Venue Edgefield, SC

Elegance at Its Finest - Only
a Phone Call Away

If you're ready to learn more about Abney Hall as your wedding venue, don't hesitate to reach out. We would love to hear more about your plans, your vision, and your needs. We know that planning a wedding isn't easy. It takes time, attention to detail, and a whole lot of patience. Our goal is to help provide you with all the info you need to learn more about our venue. Once you decide on a date, we'll work closely with you and your vendors to craft a wedding experience that you will treasure for the rest of your life.

Our available dates for your big day are going quick, especially during peak seasons like spring and fall. We look forward to hearing from you soon!

Contact us today for a FREE initial consultation
 Event Space Edgefield, SC

Latest News in Edgefield, SC

National Newspaper Week 2022

All writers in Op Ed are here to inform and acknowledge issues of importance to our communities, however these writings represent the views and opinions of the authors and not necessarily of The Advertiser. The 82nd annual National newspaper week is a recognition of the service of newspapers and their employees throughout the United States and Canada and is sponsored by Newspaper Association Managers.This year, National Newspaper Week got overlooked by the Advertiser, in the rush of things, and a wonderful L...

All writers in Op Ed are here to inform and acknowledge issues of importance to our communities, however these writings represent the views and opinions of the authors and not necessarily of The Advertiser.

The 82nd annual National newspaper week is a recognition of the service of newspapers and their employees throughout the United States and Canada and is sponsored by Newspaper Association Managers.

This year, National Newspaper Week got overlooked by the Advertiser, in the rush of things, and a wonderful Letter to the Editor came this past week to remind us of what a newspaper is all about. The week of October 2-8 was the time to hold this observance. Apologies to our readership for pushing aside the event, and many thanks to the author of the letter– one may read below as a Letter to the Editor — for bringing into focus the meaning of a newspaper, at least to one family.

This letter from the community, which speaks to our newspaper in very special terms, came last Tuesday as we went to press. Here we share it with our readers.

Letter to the Editor

Grateful for the Edgefield Advertiser

Moving from the southwest to Edgefield, S.C., last year was quite an adventure, to say the least. I sold my home in Northern Utah, put my world into a storage unit, then bought an old ’31 RV and trekked me and my two adult daughters to this little blip on the map. We had no friends or family here to speak of, no idea of anything other than what I could glean from Google, and one of the ways we prepared ourselves was by keeping expectations low and elbows greased.

With that, since we’d always subscribed to a local newspaper, we gave a kind of martyr’s sigh at the offering here for Edgefield; no dailies or big Sunday bundles with striking headlines, sophisticated commentaries, or comics and glossy ads with coupons. “Ah, small town life,” we told each other, “that’s okay.” It didn’t take long to realize how little we actually cared for those things as we discovered the richness of The Edgefield Advertiser. With national and international news blasted nonstop online, we look forward now to settling into the local happenings and folks presented each week in our tidy newspaper. We especially enjoy the spunky intelligence of Blaney Pridgen (oh my gosh, the Alien invitations article – so great) and Robert Scott; they’re an absolute joy to read. Dr. Dwella Nelson is a real asset as well, and we’ve never seen a newspaper that allowed the kind of sound Biblical commentary and encouragement that we get from Sigrid Fowler each week. So many things to be grateful for since we’ve moved here; beautiful town, kind people, and a perfect local newspaper – well, perfect for us.

Thank you, Edgefield.

Natalie Ginger

PS: No more piled-high stacks of unread, bulky newspapers is really nice, too.

78th Reunion, the Edgefield High School Class of 1944

Pictured, left to right: Remaining members of the Class of 1944, Lucille Ouzts Padgett, Ann Bolton Connelly, PeeWeePadgett, Dorothy Ouzts Wofford, and Doris Hair Jovanelly.The Edgefield High School graduating class of 1944 held their seventy-eighth reunion earlier this month with a lunch meeting at the Triangle Restaurant in Johnston. Accompanied by family and friends, five members of the Class of ’44 were present: From Edgefield, Ann Bolton Connelly and PeeWee Padgett; from Johnston, Lucille Outzs Padgett and D...

Pictured, left to right: Remaining members of the Class of 1944, Lucille Ouzts Padgett, Ann Bolton Connelly, PeeWeePadgett, Dorothy Ouzts Wofford, and Doris Hair Jovanelly.

The Edgefield High School graduating class of 1944 held their seventy-eighth reunion earlier this month with a lunch meeting at the Triangle Restaurant in Johnston. Accompanied by family and friends, five members of the Class of ’44 were present: From Edgefield, Ann Bolton Connelly and PeeWee Padgett; from Johnston, Lucille Outzs Padgett and Dorothy Outzs Wofford; and from West Columbia, Doris Hair Jovanelly. The five expressed sadness over the loss of Betty Carey, another member of the class who was present at the reunion last year.

The table was lovely with a flower arrangement in green and yellow. Yellow flowers surrounded by a spray of glossy green leaves from the yard of Dottie Wofford matched the green and yellow napkins at each plate and created an effect both charming and nostalgic–a reminder of the school colors, green and yellow. A beautiful oblong container added the gold of brass to the color scheme.

A highlight of the luncheon was the reading of the reunion poem, composed annually in honor of the occasion. Poet Doris Jovanelly provided copies to all in attendance and read her composition to the gathering. The poem is included below:

78th

Five members here from

Edgefield High Class of ‘44,’

Happy to enjoy together once more;

Sadly, another one missing since

We last met–Betty Carey,

Her smile we won’t forget,

And all others no longer here.

We have many memories so dear.

When our time today must end,

May God’s Blessings go with us

‘Round the bend.’

The blessing was said, and lunch began. The fare could be described as the Triangle at its best, and the conversation was lively all around the table. Teachers, sports events, and other school particulars were recalled as stories from high school days seventy-eight years ago amused the class members and their guests. Principal R. O. Derrick was remembered with affection, and it was noted that the annual, dedicated to him in 1944, and took its name, The Rod, from his initials. This annual can actually be found online.

The seventy-eighth reunion of the Class of ’44 was enhanced by perfect weather, and all who attended were in good spirits for this special occasion. The event was a great success, enjoyed by everyone.

78th Reunion, the Edgefield High School Class of 1944 added by admin on November 2, 2022View all posts by admin →

SC's savings account declined in 2022. Voters to decide if state should save more

Lawmakers spent much of this year advocating for South Carolina to increase its budget allocation for rainy day funds to 10% of the previous year's revenue from 7%. They said that the state needed to set aside more money to ensure that the government had enough to overcome economic headwinds, much like the ones they faced during the Great Recession and during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.To that end, they passed legislation earlier this year to put two questions on the ballot:One, should the state increase its a...

Lawmakers spent much of this year advocating for South Carolina to increase its budget allocation for rainy day funds to 10% of the previous year's revenue from 7%. They said that the state needed to set aside more money to ensure that the government had enough to overcome economic headwinds, much like the ones they faced during the Great Recession and during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

To that end, they passed legislation earlier this year to put two questions on the ballot:

One, should the state increase its allocation for its rainy day fund, to combat unexpected economic downturn, from 5% of the previous year's revenue to 7%.

Two, should the state increase its allocation to its capital reserves, intended to be used for improvements to infrastructure, from 2% of the previous year's revenue to 3%.

A new report by Pew Charitable Trusts gives an idea of why lawmakers pushed to put those questions on the ballot.

According to a data analysis conducted by researchers, states across the U.S. were estimated to reach a combined savings of a record $136.5 billion by the close of fiscal 2022. "That is enough money to cover state spending for a median of 42.5 days, or approximately 50%, more than just two years ago before the COVID recession," said Justin Theal, an officer on the state fiscal policy team at The Pew Charitable Trusts.

However, as per the report, South Carolina's savings account was set to take a hit in 2022.

In the last fiscal year, buoyed by the budget surpluses, thanks to higher than expected tax revenue growth and one-time federal aid, the state was sitting on $1.7 billion worth of rainy day funds. Researchers estimate that the fund will decline to $1.2 billion this fiscal year, as per data in the report. The 2022 fiscal year started on July 1.

That means that the strength of the rainy day budget, measured by the number of days the government could run if all it had was the rainy day budget money to funds its services, had declined. While in 2021, the state could run for just over two months− 74 days, to be specific.

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In 2022, that strength had declined as the state would only be able to run for 42.6 days.

Researchers collected their data from the "The Fiscal Survey of the States,” submitted by the National Association of State Budget Officers. The report, however, said that it was expected that revenue estimates could change, and for South Carolina, they did.

Earlier this year, the SC Board of Economic Advisors revised their revenue estimates and said that the rainy day fund would actually have $1.5 billion more than the earlier estimate of $1.2 billion.

"Pew provides a lot of valuable information," Frank Rainwater, Executive Director of SC Revenue and Fiscal Affairs said. "But I think a limitation of this report was they had to use projections that were available at the time. It appears that actual data from South Carolina showed better fiscal results, and we would have had a better score in their calculation had they been able to use more recent data."

A Sept. 2022 Moody Analytics report did a budget stress test to assess whether states were prepared for recessionary shocks.

South Carolina does not have enough savings in its rainy day funds to weather a moderate recession without having to resort to severe spending cuts or tax increases to close the potential budget gaps to come. According to the report, only 18 states, not including SC, have sufficient funds set aside to weather a moderate recession.

Those are the facts confronting voters are they step out to vote. As of Nov. 2, 11% − 383,063 of South Carolina's 3.7 million registered voters have stepped early into polling stations to cast their vote.

The urgency of reworking South Carolina's rainy day funds

The concept of rainy day funds or "economic stabilization funds" grew in popularity after the Great Recession between 2007 and 2009. Several states took massive hits to their ability to generate revenue and had to resort to emptying their coffers and making mid-year budget cuts to get by. Since then, the COVID-19 pandemic and the ongoing inflation crisis have only contributed to further economic challenges.

The state's rainy day funds have grown consistently over the last two decades, and so have its strengths to weather crises. For instance, in the 2009 fiscal year, in the thick of the recession, the state had emptied its reserves. In the year before that, the government would have run only for five days on the amount of reserves it had.

Compared to that in the fiscal year 2020, during another financial crisis, the state could run its operations for 49.9 days, and that grew to 74 days in the last fiscal year.

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However, the inflation crisis in the past few months has added to uncertainties.

"So many temporary factors like higher than forecasted tax revenue growth, and historic but one time, federal aid helped drive up record reserves across the states," Theal said. "But that trend is not expected to continue at the same pace through the end of this budget year."

While states have experienced unexpectedly strong financial conditions over the last two years, Theal said, policymakers are now facing this crucial inflection point where they would have to grapple with challenges, like the weakening economy as the Federal Reserve raises interest rates to get a handle on historically high inflation.

Meanwhile, the federal COVID-19 aid that came through is set to expire in the next couple of years. "So those are very real concerns on the minds of policymakers these days," Theal said.

As of now, the state's rainy day fund is the 25th strongest across the states. A near mirror image of the national trend, Theal said, and about the middle of the pack compared to Georgia and North Carolina.

Earlier this year, the General Assembly voted to add the two constitutional amendments to the ballot. Rep. West Cox, R-Anderson, who was the lead sponsor of the effort, had said back in February that it had become more and more expensive for the state to maintain essential government services.

"Our state is on sound financial footing due to the robust economy created by the citizens of South Carolina and the work of this legislature to ensure that we wisely appropriate tax revenues,” Cox said back then.

Though the measure passed with a majority, dissent came from Senate Majority Leader Shane Massey, R-Edgefield.

While he agreed with the increasing the "General Reserve," which would act as the primary stabilizing fund, was beneficial for the state. He was unsure about the Capital Reserve Fund since, despite the name, the money wasn't always used on capital projects such as building or road improvements, he said.

"This is a trick," Massey had said back then. "The capital reserve fund is not really a reserve fund. All that does is you keep it for a year before you figure out which projects you want to spend it on,” he said.

Massey said that lawmakers instead should put all the money in the General Reserve Fund.

In fiscal year 2021, the state had reserves worth $1.7 billion, as per data collected by Pew Charitable Trusts.

House Speaker Murrell Smith, R-Sumter, said in an October press release that a “yes” vote on the two upcoming constitutional amendments was a vote for fiscal prudence. "By boosting the rate requirements of our revenues to the General Reserve Fund and its Capital Reserve Fund, we will be better prepared for economic downturn, natural disaster, or budget shortfall," Smith said.

Ballot questions posed to SC voters about amending state constitution — here’s why

During the Great Recession in 2008, South Carolina emptied out its reserves, and lawmakers had to make midyear budget cuts to keep the state running.COLUMBIA, S.C. (WCSC) - During the Great Recession in 2008, South Carolina emptied out its reserves, and lawmakers had to make midyear budget cuts to keep the state running.If that happen again, members of the legislature say they want South Carolina to be better equipped to stave off those hits, and they are now asking voters to give them the ability to do that.When South C...

During the Great Recession in 2008, South Carolina emptied out its reserves, and lawmakers had to make midyear budget cuts to keep the state running.

COLUMBIA, S.C. (WCSC) - During the Great Recession in 2008, South Carolina emptied out its reserves, and lawmakers had to make midyear budget cuts to keep the state running.

If that happen again, members of the legislature say they want South Carolina to be better equipped to stave off those hits, and they are now asking voters to give them the ability to do that.

When South Carolinians head to the polls for the general election, they will all see two questions posed to every voter about requiring more money be added to state reserves each year.

Proponents of these constitutional amendments, who are asking voters to vote “yes” to them, said they will require the state to save more and spend less of its money.

“Without raising taxes, the state will put more revenue into its rainy-day funds to ensure it can meet the needs of running the state government in the event of an economic downturn,” Rep. West Cox (R - Anderson) said.

The first question relates to South Carolina’s general reserve fund, commonly referred to as its rainy-day fund: Amendment 1 - Must Section 36(A), Article III of the Constitution of this State, relating to the General Reserve Fund, be amended so as to provide that the General Reserve Fund of five percent of general fund revenue of the latest completed fiscal year must be increased each year by one-half of one percent of the general fund revenue of the latest completed fiscal year until it equals seven percent of such revenues?

That question asks if the state legislature should increase the amount of money it is required to put in its rainy-day fund from 5% of the state’s revenue from the year before up to 7%.

That would be phased in over four years, with the requirement rising a half-percent each year.

The second question concerns the state’s capital reserve fund, which primarily but not exclusively funds major capital projects: Amendment 2 - Must Section 36(B), Article III of the Constitution of this State be amended so as to provide that the Capital Reserve Fund of two percent of the general fund revenue of the latest completed fiscal year be increased to three percent of the general fund revenue of the latest completed fiscal year and to provide that the first use of the Capital Reserve Fund must be to offset midyear budget reductions?

That question asks if the amount of money required to go into capital reserves should increase from 2% to 3%, and it would also mandate any money needed offset midyear budget cuts comes from this account first before tapping into the larger general reserves.

If voters approve both these amendments, the amount required to go into the combined reserves each year would jump from 7% of the annual revenue to 10%.

They have the backing of groups including the South Carolina Policy Council and Americans for Tax Reform, who held a joint news conference Monday in Columbia to encourage South Carolinians to vote “yes” on both the measures.

“If you’re on the left side, there’s a real reason to vote for these amendments because you can block significant cuts to government services in times of economic downfall,” South Carolina Policy Council Executive Director Dallas Woodhouse said. “If you’re on the right, you can help starve off tax increases when times get tough for state government.”

Nothing currently prevents the legislature from adding more money to reserves than constitutionally required, and the General Assembly has been doing that in recent years as the state budget yielded surpluses.

“What this does is binds the hands of future General Assemblies so that they have to save more to ensure that, in the future, legislators at the State House are being as fiscally responsible as we have been over the last several years by saving and boosting these reserve accounts,” Cox said.

The state legislature voted earlier this year to put these questions before voters on the ballot.

While they generated near-unanimous support, Senate Majority Leader Shane Massey (R - Edgefield) voted against their inclusion on the ballot.

He agreed the General Assembly should save more money, making the case it should be even higher than the 10% that would be saved under these two amendments, but argued this proposal is not the most responsible way to do it.

“This is a trick. The capital reserve fund is not really a reserve fund. All that does is you keep it for a year before you figure out which projects you want to spend it on,” Massey said during debate in the Senate on June 15, countering that all the additional money should go into the general reserve fund.

Cox, who worked to get the ballot measure approved in the House of Representatives, called that a mischaracterization, responding members of the General Assembly would rather spend money when they have it instead of tying it up for another year.

These are two separate questions to change the state constitution, so voters can vote the same way to both of them, or vote “yes” to one and “no” to the other.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

NCMH Midlands hospital named one of America’s 100 best for orthopedic surgery

NEWBERRY — Newberry County Memorial Hospital announced that it has been named one of America’s 100 Best Hospitals for Orthopedic Surgery in 2023, according to new research published by Healthgrades.Newberry Hospital is the only hospital in South Carolina’s Midlands region* to receive the award and be among the top 5% in the nation for Overall Orthopedic Services- distinctions that reflect their outstanding clinical excellence and dedication to their patients.Newberry Hospital is also the recipient of the follo...

NEWBERRY — Newberry County Memorial Hospital announced that it has been named one of America’s 100 Best Hospitals for Orthopedic Surgery in 2023, according to new research published by Healthgrades.

Newberry Hospital is the only hospital in South Carolina’s Midlands region* to receive the award and be among the top 5% in the nation for Overall Orthopedic Services- distinctions that reflect their outstanding clinical excellence and dedication to their patients.

Newberry Hospital is also the recipient of the following achievements:

• Recipient of the Healthgrades 2023 Orthopedic Surgery Excellence Award™.

• Recipient of the Healthgrades Joint Replacement Excellence Award™ for two years in a row (2022-2023).

• Named among the top 10% in the nation for joint replacement for two years in a row (2022-2023).

• Five-Star recipient for total knee replacement for two years in a row (2022-2023).

• Five-Star recipient for total hip replacement for five years in a row (2019-2023).

• Five-Star recipient for hip fracture treatment for nin years in a row (2015-2023).

• Five-Star recipient for spinal fusion surgery in 2023.

“We are extremely proud to be recognized as one of America’s 100 Best Hospitals for our joint replacement surgery,” said Bruce Baldwin, chief executive officer of Newberry Hospital. “Our exceptional team of physicians and staff continually strive to provide the safest, quality care for our patients. Their goal is to help our patients return to normal daily activities and improve their quality of life.”

Healthgrades evaluated patient mortality and complication rates for 31 of the most common conditions and procedures at nearly 4,500 hospitals across the country to identify the top-performing hospitals for orthopedic surgery. This year’s analysis revealed significant variation in patient outcomes between America’s 100 Best Hospitals for Orthopedic Surgery and hospitals that did not receive a distinction. From 2019-21, patients treated at hospitals receiving the America’s 100 Best Hospitals for Orthopedic Surgery Award have, on average, a 41.6% lower risk of experiencing a complication while in the hospital than if they were treated in hospitals that did not receive the award.**

“We commend Newberry Hospital for their ongoing commitment to providing high-quality care to patients undergoing orthopedic surgery,” said Brad Bowman, MD, chief medical officer and head of data science at Healthgrades. “Consumers can feel confident that hospitals with this recognition have demonstrated their ability to deliver consistently exceptional outcomes.”

Consumers can visit Healthgrades.com to learn more about how Healthgrades measures hospital quality and access a patient-friendly overview of the complete methodology here.

**Statistics are based on Healthgrades analysis of MedPAR data for years 2019 through 2021 and represent three-year estimates for Medicare patients only.

*The Midlands region of South Carolina including Aiken, Barnwell, Chester, Edgefield, Fairfield, Kershaw, Lancaster, Lexington, Newberry, Richland, Saluda and York counties.

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