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Wedding & Event Venue Near Saint George, SC.

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Your Magic Moment Awaits

Your wedding day. Without a doubt, it's one of the most significant events you will ever experience - when you and the love of your life officially seal the deal and get married. On this day, your friends and family will gather to celebrate the next step in your life. Photographers will be running around snapping photos, catering plates delicious food for guests to enjoy, and the DJ sets the mood for a night of fun and libation. You've worked extra hard to make everything look perfect and run smoothly. You have examined every moving part down to the tiniest detail. At the center of all your effort is your wedding venue in Saint George, SC.

Your event space can mean the difference between an unforgettable event and an average occasion. Capturing your uniqueness as a couple is paramount to a memorable wedding. But, without the right venue location and staff, your unforgettable event can turn into a painfully average occasion. Fortunately, at Abney Hall, you won't ever have to worry about dingy reception spaces and crummy chow halls.

Constructed in Saint George, SC, in 1962, Abney Hall is 15,000 square feet and sits on 500 acres of land, making it a large wedding venue unlike any other. Abney Hall was originally the home of Mrs. Josephine Abney, a Saint George native who was a lifelong philanthropist. Mrs. Abney devoted much of her time and effort towards supporting charities, educational institutions, hospitals, and other noble efforts. Today, Abney Hall stands tall as a symbol of love, both in our community and for the couples who choose to get married here.

Abney Hall is an exclusive event experience unlike any other, surrounded by verdant forests and sparkling ponds. Our venue is a natural fit for several occasions, including:

Special Event Space Saint George, SC

Weddings

 Event Venue Saint George, SC

Bridal Showers

 Event Space Saint George, SC

Bridal Portraits

 Rehearsal Dinner Venue Saint George, SC

Rehearsal Dinners

 Bridal Shower Venue Saint George, SC

Corporate Events

 Business Event Space Saint George, SC

Much More!

 Wedding Space Saint George, SC

The Top Wedding Venue in Saint George, SC

The beginning of your life starts at Abney Hall. With our team by your side, we can create the fairy tale wedding you have dreamed about since childhood. Whether you have 100 guests or 1,000, our waterfront ceremony locations and French-inspired courtyard are perfect for your big day. Celebrate in luxurious style surrounded by shady magnolia trees, a private forest, large ponds, and the beauty of Mother Nature. While our venue location and aesthetic have been praised far and wide, so too have the practical aspects of Abney Hall. Looking for a relaxing, comfortable spot for your bridal party to get ready in? We offer an entire floor in the Abney Hall residence to get the bridal party ready. Want to make your groomsman feel extra-special too? We've got a private, plush house just feet from a sparkling pond that is a proper hangout spot for the guys in your group.

To make life easier on you, we also offer Abney Hall as your go-to spot for rehearsal dinners. Why book an expensive restaurant or travel to another location when unmatched beauty and convenience are right at your fingertips? Abney Hall is just the place for that very important dinner the night before your big day. We are also happy to host your bridal shower at Abney Hall. Our venue makes for one of Saint George's most unique bridal shower settings, where your family and friends can gather to give gifts and be merry before you walk down the aisle.

With such a large, magnificent house and a vast property, Abney Hall also makes for an unforgettable location for your bridal portraits and other wedding-related photography needs. Don't take our word for it - book a tour and see for yourself why so many new brides and grooms choose Abney Hall as their wedding venue in Saint George.

 Wedding Venue Saint George, SC

What Sets Abney Hall Apart from Other Wedding Venues in Saint George?

You've already found the person you want to spend the rest of your life beside. The next step? Finding the perfect wedding venue for your ceremony, reception, and celebration of your lifelong commitment to one another. Remember, the backdrop for photos, dancing, eating, and all other activities will be at your wedding venue. That's why we work so hard to set Abney Hall apart from our competitors - so you and your guests can focus on love and living your new life while we work with your vendors and photographers to make your magic night a reality.

Here are just a few reasons why guests choose Abney Hall as their wedding venue in Saint George, SC, along with some helpful tips from our experienced wedding venue staff:

Venue Size

Choosing the appropriate-sied venue for your desired guest count is a critical decision. A venue's capacity affects the number of people you need to consider having at your ceremony and reception. As you're first starting out, we recommend having a guest count in mind as you're searching for the right venue. Try to stick with that number. You may fall in love with a particular venue, but if its max capacity can't accommodate your guest count, it may be time to cross them off your list.

 Corporate Conference Hall Saint George, SC
Abney Hall Pro Tip

Abney Hall Pro Tip:

Keep in mind that this is your big day. You shouldn't feel obligated to invite the college roommate you shared a dorm with for one semester. At the end of the day, your wedding venue should be one that can accommodate those closest to you. Abney Hall is equipped for both small and large weddings, consisting of 500 acres of forest, ponds, and lush natural beauty. Whether you want an intimate wedding with only your best friends or a grand ceremony with hundreds of people, we have the right amount of room to make you comfortable.

Location and Nearby Lodging

On your big day, you're likely to have friends and family traveling in from other parts of the state or country. These folks will need a place to stay during and even after your wedding. Accessibility and ease are important factors when it comes to choosing your wedding venue for both you and your guests.

Located in Saint George, SC, Abney Hall is situated in a memorable, natural setting, giving your wedding a private vibe in the midst of Mother Nature. While we pride ourselves on having a secluded wedding event space, our venue is within an easy driving distance of hotels and vacation rentals.

Abney Hall Pro Tip

Abney Hall Pro Tip:

When you contact us for a tour, make sure to speak with our experienced venue manager about nearby hotels and shuttle service options. We understand that your guest's comfort and convenience are important, and we're happy to work with you to figure out the best way to get your guests to Abney Hall.

Venue Staff

At Abney Hall, our staff has earned its reputation as one of the industry's most friendly, accessible teams. We will provide you with a purpose-minded point of contact that can help answer questions relating to timelines, preferred vendors, and every aspect of your wedding. When you tour our wedding venue in Saint George, SC, for the first time, we want you to feel like you have all the information you need to make an informed purchasing decision.

We would be happy to go over:
  • Venue Pricing
  • Ceremony Specifics
  • Reception Specifics
  • Catering Possibilities
  • Decorating Possibilities
  • Entertainment Options
  • Photography and Photo Opportunities
  • Venue Amenities
  • Bridal Party Needs
  • Groomsman Needs

At Abney Hall, our goal is to be your first resource when it comes to setting up and coordinating the details of your wedding day.

Decor

When it comes to your wedding's decor, you probably already have a few ideas in mind. We love it when our brides and grooms have a vision in mind because one of our greatest joys is turning that vision into a reality. At Abney Hall, our team is available to help you and your decorator fit, accent, and accommodate your fairy-tale wedding - whatever that may be.

Are you looking to dress up your wedding with decorations galore? Just want to add a few accents that tie into your preferred color palette? Abney Hall is versatile and ready to help however we are able.

 Reception Hall Saint George, SC
Abney-Hall-Pro-Tip

Abney Hall Pro Tip:

If you're thinking about bringing in your own greenery, lighting, floral pieces, and more, we recommend discussing your vision with us on your initial tour of our event space. That way, we can get a head start on making your big day exactly how you envision it.

Photo Opportunities

10 years from now, when you and your spouse are celebrating your anniversary, you will pull out photographs from your wedding and will reminisce about the unforgettable time you spent at Abney Hall. Your wedding photos will be with you forever, and as such, we work closely with you and your photographer to suggest extra-special photo op spots that you can only find on Abney Hall grounds.

From the grand staircase and French-inspired courtyard to our manicured gardens and lovely pond, there is no shortage of photo-op locations for your photographer to choose from. As one of the most popular wedding venues in Saint George, SC, we have worked with dozens of photographers over the years.

Our experience has allowed us to cultivate a list of preferred photographers - all of whom have the talent to take your pictures to the next level in a setting they're familiar with. We encourage you to check out our gallery to get a sense of the scope of our wedding venue and gain inspiration from other happy couples.

Abney-Hall-Pro-Tip

Abney Hall Pro Tip

The gallery on our website is extensive but be sure to check out our Facebook and Instagram pages as well. We keep our social pages updated with recent wedding photographs, giving you an incredible resource that you can use for your own photography purposes.

Special Event Space Saint George, SC

The Premier Corporate Event Venue in Saint George, SC

Abney Hall is known across the United States for our stunning weddings, but we also play host to some of the largest corporate events in South Carolina. Why choose a bland, lifeless meeting space when you can enjoy the beauty of Mother Nature coupled with a professional atmosphere? If you have an important team-building event or corporate conference that you have to coordinate, look no further than Abney Hall.

The epitome of class and style, our corporate event space is large, lavish, and chock-full of onsite amenities for you and your co-workers to enjoy. If your team needs a morale boost, don't bring them to the local Olive Garden for a cheap lunch. Treat them to a refreshing experience in our main dining room, where we can work with you to incorporate your catering options with the goals of your event.

When the hard work is done, and your team needs a breather, what better way to relax than with a quick dip in our pool? To burn off a little steam, head over to our brand-new tennis court - the perfect place to get some exercise in an ultra-private setting while you enjoy the sights and sounds of nature. Don't forget to bring your fishing poles for a couple of hours of fishing. There's even an opportunity to go hunting if you wish.

 Event Venue Saint George, SC

Elegance at Its Finest - Only
a Phone Call Away

If you're ready to learn more about Abney Hall as your wedding venue, don't hesitate to reach out. We would love to hear more about your plans, your vision, and your needs. We know that planning a wedding isn't easy. It takes time, attention to detail, and a whole lot of patience. Our goal is to help provide you with all the info you need to learn more about our venue. Once you decide on a date, we'll work closely with you and your vendors to craft a wedding experience that you will treasure for the rest of your life.

Our available dates for your big day are going quick, especially during peak seasons like spring and fall. We look forward to hearing from you soon!

Contact us today for a FREE initial consultation
 Event Space Saint George, SC

Latest News in Saint George, SC

St. George family recounts moments trees fell on their house during Monday night's storms

DORCHESTER COUNTY, S.C. (WCIV) — Not one, but three pine trees fell on a house in St. George when severe thunderstorms rolled through Monday night."So, it’s a lot to take in, and then thinking about the process that we have to go through to get the work done is something else too," said Shawn Calvin.St. George family recounts moments trees fell on their house during Monday night's storms (WCIV)Calvin and her husband, Frederick, have owned their home on Davis Terrace for about 15 years. They are deva...

DORCHESTER COUNTY, S.C. (WCIV) — Not one, but three pine trees fell on a house in St. George when severe thunderstorms rolled through Monday night.

"So, it’s a lot to take in, and then thinking about the process that we have to go through to get the work done is something else too," said Shawn Calvin.

St. George family recounts moments trees fell on their house during Monday night's storms (WCIV)

Calvin and her husband, Frederick, have owned their home on Davis Terrace for about 15 years. They are devastated and overwhelmed by the mess.

Read more: Komoroski denied bond; Women accused of killing bride and injuring groom will remain in jail.

"About 9 o'clock is when the weather started to shift," she said. "It started raining really heavily, and the wind started blowing, and then by 10 o'clock is actually when it got really bad. So at that point, I was in the den talking to my sister and my husband was in bed."

She told her sister she was going to put the dog up in the other room and get ready for bed. That's when the ceiling came crashing down.

"I noticed that the middle part of the ceiling in the den fell in, and rainwater was coming in at that point," she said. "When I went down the hall to grab my purse, I noticed some of the insulation was coming down in the hallway."

They just finished remodeling the home, so the damage hit hard, but they are still grateful.

Read more: Ex-banker Russell Laffitte sentenced to 7 years in prison for role in Murdaugh fraud conspiracy.

"Well I’m full, but blessed because nobody was injured," Calvin said. "The dog and my husband, we all got out safely, but it’s just a lot to take in because we have had the house newly renovated. We haven’t been back here a year."

Now, they will find someplace to stay until they know if it’s safe.

"We’ll stay with relatives until we know the plan for repairs or what our next steps are," Calvin added.

But in the meantime: "So, we’re hoping that they can get it repaired in a few months or less, and we’ll move back in, prayerfully. Until then, we’ll just reside with relatives," Calvin said.

According to the National Weather Service in Charleston, there were 18 reports of wind damage across Colleton and Dorchester counties.

St. George restaurant marries faith, family and food

ST. GEORGE — Sweeping the floor following the lunch rush at Nannie’s Kitchen, Sherrie Benson sings along to “It Matters to the Master” by Southern Gospel group The Collingsworth Family.By the time the small St. George restaurant has closed at 3 p.m., Benson has been hard at work for close to 12 hours, baking off biscuits and muffins in the wee hours of the morning. Later in the early evening on this Monday, she will lead a Bible st...

ST. GEORGE — Sweeping the floor following the lunch rush at Nannie’s Kitchen, Sherrie Benson sings along to “It Matters to the Master” by Southern Gospel group The Collingsworth Family.

By the time the small St. George restaurant has closed at 3 p.m., Benson has been hard at work for close to 12 hours, baking off biscuits and muffins in the wee hours of the morning. Later in the early evening on this Monday, she will lead a Bible study at the restaurant she opened with her husband Shane in November 2021. The group of about a dozen women planned to discuss a book titled, “Twelve Extraordinary Women: How God Shaped Women of the Bible, and What He Wants to Do with You.”

Some restaurants feel like they’ve been around for decades, even if they haven’t. Nannie’s Kitchen, located at 307 North Parler Ave. just under one hour from downtown Charleston, is one of those places.

Homegrown knickknacks fill the walls, from coffee mugs to children’s soccer jerseys. By the door, there is a photo of Edna, or Nannie, Benson’s grandmother and the inspiration for the small restaurant. Edna was a praying grandmother who helped get Benson through tough times, she told me after I recently visited Nannie’s for lunch.

After placing my order for the barbecue sandwich with mustard sauce, I turned my attention to the baked goods case, which Benson later told me was decimated from a busy weekend. There was still more than enough to choose from, including apple fritters, blueberry muffins and a chocolate-covered cake pop with a delightfully unexpected strawberry filling. In addition to the baked goods, Nannie’s Kitchen serves breakfast sandwiches, soups, salads, meatloaf, grilled pimento cheese, hot dogs, Hershey’s Ice Cream and more.

Food first connected Sherrie and Shane when they met, but opening a restaurant only became a reality when they moved to St. George from Summerville in 2020. The couple fell in love with the calm streets and friendly neighbors in their new South Carolina home, a place that felt more comfortable than a rapidly developing Summerville.

Before opening, the Bensons talked about the venture with their nephew. He told them that the restaurant would either be accepted with open arms or ignored. As Shane completed the renovations himself in just 90 days, Sherrie prayed that they were making the right decision.

“I rely on God for everything. And I knew that he would see me through it,” Benson said. “And he has.”

Close to two years later, customers are calling in their biscuit orders from the interstate, and the dentist down the road is coming by for an Americano with frothed cream. Nannie’s Kitchen sees a steady stream of weekly business, serving a community with just a handful of independently owned restaurants.

“They have embraced us,” Sherrie Benson said. “I have customers that have become like family.”

It’s hard not to think about family when you walk inside Nannie’s Kitchen. As I looked up at the 20-plus flavors of Hershey’s scoops sold to the left of the baked goods case, I couldn’t help but think of my own grandfather, who adored green mint chip ice cream.

Business

In a world of restaurant service fees and difficult-to-snag reservations, it is refreshing to step inside a place with such a strong focus on faith and community. The food — from the fluffy muffins to griddle-crisped barbecue sandwich — is worthy of praise, too. Next time, I must try Sherrie Benson’s biscuits, which road trippers have been clamoring for as they pass through St. George to and from Charleston.

Nannie’s Kitchen is open from 6 a.m.-6 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and 6 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday. For more information, nannieskitchenllc.com.

Dorchester County rezones land near St. George community to industrial

ST. GEORGE — Despite pushback from several residents, Dorchester County council has rezoned over 270 acres of land to industrial.The original plan was to rezone two parcels of land: 272 acres along Pecan Tree Road and Highway 78, and 88 acres along Pecan Tree Road and Sugar Hill Lane. The planning commission decided against the smaller section, considering how close it was to the Sugar Hill community.Before the vote, the land was zoned as agricultural residential, meant for both building homes and farming in rural portion...

ST. GEORGE — Despite pushback from several residents, Dorchester County council has rezoned over 270 acres of land to industrial.

The original plan was to rezone two parcels of land: 272 acres along Pecan Tree Road and Highway 78, and 88 acres along Pecan Tree Road and Sugar Hill Lane. The planning commission decided against the smaller section, considering how close it was to the Sugar Hill community.

Before the vote, the land was zoned as agricultural residential, meant for both building homes and farming in rural portions of the county. This zoning requires the density to not exceed one principal dwelling per acre of land, and should have its own sanitation through an on-site disposal system or sewer connection.

With an industrial rezoning, the land will allow for warehousing, distribution, as well as manufacturing. The county is still undecided on what specifically will be done with this parcel of land, but county council vice chairman David Chinnis said there are developers looking to buy the property.

Chinnis added that rezoning the parcel to industrial — to be a part of Winding Woods Commerce Park — had been the plan since it was purchased by an LLC in 2006.

Numerous St. George residents had spoken at county council and planning commissions meetings voicing their concerns over the rezoning.

Betty Collins, a pastor at New Hope AME Church, specified how residents worry about the noise any new industry may bring, and the county hasn’t shared any information with residents regarding how they will protect the community from potential nuisances.

“In (Dorchester County’s) ordinance it says for industry and manufacturing, you are allowed 90 decibels as your standard, when the World Health Organization and the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health says nothing over 80. Anything over 80 then damages your hearing or causes hearing loss,” Collins said.

Charleston is going to look a lot different in 2050. A booming population and rising sea levels will reshape the city. One new resource could offer a way for local leaders to glimpse the future.

FUTure Urban-Regional Environment Simulation version three, or FUTURES 3.0, allows researchers to play out hypothetical changes in urban growth and migration in response to rising sea levels. First outlined this month in the peer-reviewed journal Scientific Reports, the method uses “spatially interactive” modeling (that is, what happens in one area impacts another) to determine how the city and its surrounding communities could change in coming decades due to flooding and sea-level rise.

In Charleston, the project’s researchers found a sample case with numerous potential variables.

Sea levels in the region are expected to rise 14-18 inches over the next 30 years, federal climate researchers predict. That increased water level will make the region even more prone to flooding.

“The Charleston Metro Area is also growing three times faster than the U.S. average, putting pressure on the city’s infrastructure and capacity to effectively manage coastal flooding,” the study’s authors note.

The city is weighing numerous projects to combat the inundation, from a proposed $1.3 billion sea wall which would encircle the peninsula to a forthcoming tidal and inland study that will examine flooding-related problems in West Ashley and other parts of the city.

Georgina Sanchez, one of the study’s authors, said she hopes the research will provide a helpful road map to city leaders for navigating Charleston’s flooded future.

“The idea is not to say, ‘Here’s a perfect scenario,’ but, rather, providing a tool for exploration (so) we can understand the long-term consequences of our current development choices,” said Sanchez, a research scholar at North Carolina State University’s Center for Geospatial Analytics.

Our public service and investigative reporting is among the most important work we do. It’s also the most expensive reporting we do. We can’t do it without your support.

So what does Charleston’s future look like according to the FUTURES 3.0 forecast?

“A lot of our projections show areas that will be newly developed and subsequently retreat,” Sanchez said. “Why not protect those areas in the first place? It’s a bit less controversial if it’s an area that has not yet been built up.”

That’s a question city leaders are struggling with. Charleston is in the process of updating its zoning codes to help prevent new developments in wetlands and flood-prone areas. But their hands are largely tied when it comes to years-old development “entitlements” — agreements the city signed with developers outlining, among other things, how many homes can be built on a piece of property. If the city backs out of those agreements, it could trigger a lawsuit, even if the developer hasn’t officially broken ground.

Rising Waters

On the other end of the spectrum, researchers also model what a climate change-instigated retreat from Charleston could look like.

Most people (about 76 percent) would stay in the Charleston-Dorchester-Berkeley county region, according to the analysis. They’d just move further inland to escape rising seas, although some would relocate as far as the West Coast. Sanchez said her team plans to analyze “climate-aware” migration patterns more in-depth in the future. She said that data could provide an important planning metric for communities further inland.

“Are these receiving communities prepared to welcome potentially thousands of climate migrants?” she asked.

Sanchez said one of the next steps for the project is to make the open-source framework more accessible to other communities; either through advanced 3D modeling or, in the long run, potentially a 2D computer-based platform.

Historic Rosenwald School to inspire exploration, learning as Children’s Museum expands

ST. GEORGE — Four former classrooms in the historic Rosenwald School in St. George will once again become a place to teach young minds as the space becomes the Children’s Museum of the Lowcountry’s first — but not last — satellite location out...

ST. GEORGE — Four former classrooms in the historic Rosenwald School in St. George will once again become a place to teach young minds as the space becomes the Children’s Museum of the Lowcountry’s first — but not last — satellite location outside of Charleston.

The renovated St. George Rosenwald school is one of about 500 in the state and one of nearly 5,000 in the South, all constructed in the early 1900s. Those who have rallied behind preserving the school envision it becoming the community center of the town. It reopened to the public in August.

When it was built in 1925, it was a six-teacher school dedicated to educating African American children. Now, the north wing of the H-shaped building will take on a new life educating future generations as an extension of the Children’s Museum of the Lowcountry.

A new museum

The approximately 2,500 square-foot space within the Rosenwald School will feature a tinker lab with hands-on exhibits to explore engineering concepts; a child-sized grocery store where children can learn about nutrition, commerce and money; a space that can promote visual and performing arts; and classroom space for educational programs or field trip groups. It is expected to open in spring 2024.

Karen Coltrane, CML’s president and CEO, called it a “natural extension of our efforts to serve the greater Lowcountry” outside of its downtown Charleston location.

Coltrane said it’s about teaching kids basic concepts that they can connect to real-world situations. For example, a child may see the apple tree and grocery area in the new exhibit, and the next time they are at the store with a parent, they can understand apples come from trees and that people buy apples at the store with money.

Charleston is going to look a lot different in 2050. A booming population and rising sea levels will reshape the city. One new resource could offer a way for local leaders to glimpse the future.

FUTure Urban-Regional Environment Simulation version three, or FUTURES 3.0, allows researchers to play out hypothetical changes in urban growth and migration in response to rising sea levels. First outlined this month in the peer-reviewed journal Scientific Reports, the method uses “spatially interactive” modeling (that is, what happens in one area impacts another) to determine how the city and its surrounding communities could change in coming decades due to flooding and sea-level rise.

In Charleston, the project’s researchers found a sample case with numerous potential variables.

Sea levels in the region are expected to rise 14-18 inches over the next 30 years, federal climate researchers predict. That increased water level will make the region even more prone to flooding.

“The Charleston Metro Area is also growing three times faster than the U.S. average, putting pressure on the city’s infrastructure and capacity to effectively manage coastal flooding,” the study’s authors note.

The city is weighing numerous projects to combat the inundation, from a proposed $1.3 billion sea wall which would encircle the peninsula to a forthcoming tidal and inland study that will examine flooding-related problems in West Ashley and other parts of the city.

Georgina Sanchez, one of the study’s authors, said she hopes the research will provide a helpful road map to city leaders for navigating Charleston’s flooded future.

“The idea is not to say, ‘Here’s a perfect scenario,’ but, rather, providing a tool for exploration (so) we can understand the long-term consequences of our current development choices,” said Sanchez, a research scholar at North Carolina State University’s Center for Geospatial Analytics.

Our public service and investigative reporting is among the most important work we do. It’s also the most expensive reporting we do. We can’t do it without your support.

So what does Charleston’s future look like according to the FUTURES 3.0 forecast?

“A lot of our projections show areas that will be newly developed and subsequently retreat,” Sanchez said. “Why not protect those areas in the first place? It’s a bit less controversial if it’s an area that has not yet been built up.”

That’s a question city leaders are struggling with. Charleston is in the process of updating its zoning codes to help prevent new developments in wetlands and flood-prone areas. But their hands are largely tied when it comes to years-old development “entitlements” — agreements the city signed with developers outlining, among other things, how many homes can be built on a piece of property. If the city backs out of those agreements, it could trigger a lawsuit, even if the developer hasn’t officially broken ground.

Rising Waters

On the other end of the spectrum, researchers also model what a climate change-instigated retreat from Charleston could look like.

Most people (about 76 percent) would stay in the Charleston-Dorchester-Berkeley county region, according to the analysis. They’d just move further inland to escape rising seas, although some would relocate as far as the West Coast. Sanchez said her team plans to analyze “climate-aware” migration patterns more in-depth in the future. She said that data could provide an important planning metric for communities further inland.

“Are these receiving communities prepared to welcome potentially thousands of climate migrants?” she asked.

Sanchez said one of the next steps for the project is to make the open-source framework more accessible to other communities; either through advanced 3D modeling or, in the long run, potentially a 2D computer-based platform.

Proposed plan to rezone 360 acres to industrial land raises community concerns

ST. GEORGE, S.C. (WCSC) - Calling one place home all your life until a rezoning request sign pops up on your street. That is what happened to a group of people who live in St. George.One developer is requesting to change more than 360 acres of residential land to industrial land that would affect large properties off Highway 78 one mile east of St. George.Although Dorchester County’s plans do not say what exactly will be built in this area, a number of residents who have spent their whole lives here say they want their la...

ST. GEORGE, S.C. (WCSC) - Calling one place home all your life until a rezoning request sign pops up on your street. That is what happened to a group of people who live in St. George.

One developer is requesting to change more than 360 acres of residential land to industrial land that would affect large properties off Highway 78 one mile east of St. George.

Although Dorchester County’s plans do not say what exactly will be built in this area, a number of residents who have spent their whole lives here say they want their land to be kept the way they’ve always known it to be.

Richard Myers was born on Sugar Hill Road in St. George and has lived here all his life.

“Everybody seems to know that something big is going to happen in this area except the people that live here,” Myers said.

He owns around 37 acres, which has the possibility of turning into industrial land.

“All of this that we’re standing on now used to be our farm, but as the years changed... the farm got smaller,” Myers said. “But we still got a farm, and we want to keep it that way. We don’t want a factory sitting in the middle of it or a warehouse.”

Another resident in the area, Barbara Felder, is the sixth generation in her family to live here. Her grandparents and aunt’s home is still on the land.

She was asked what her reaction was when she first saw the Dorchester County rezoning sign down the street.

“We were shocked,” Felder said. “There were no letters or no communication about the changes in our area.”

Felder says she worries about how this rezoning could affect pollution, their roads and access to emergency vehicles.

“We shouldn’t let the county nor the developer to come in our community and tell us what to do as taxpayers and for our future,” Felder said.

Myers says he has no intention of selling his land but knows his taxes will rise if he doesn’t.

“If they want your property, they’re going to get it because they’re going to run your taxes sky high until you say, ‘Enough,’” Myers said. “‘I got to sell it because I can’t pay the taxes.’”

Both of them say they want to be involved with the rezoning process.

“We are tired of explaining and they need to change and not think about the almighty dollar that’s coming into Dorchester County area,” Felder said.

Dorchester County did not respond for a comment because Monday was a holiday. This rezoning still has to go through three readings before it can be approved.

To take a closer look at the official rezoning plan from the county, click here.

Copyright 2023 WCSC. All rights reserved.

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